Applying to College and Your Friends

December 26, 2018 0 Comment

When it comes time to apply to college, you need a support team. And when I say ‘support team,’ I’m talking about more people than your myKlovr support team. I’m talking about your friends, too. They may not possess life experience, but as they’re going through the same things you are, they, better than anyone else, understand your hopes, dreams, and anxieties.

Friends are there to support you, and you are there to support them. However, just how much should you share about your college application journey with them? Are there any downsides to being 100% open with your friends? In this article, we’ll examine why keeping some information private might be a good idea.

When Sharing Is Caring

By all means, tell your friends where you’re applying to college. There’s no real downside. The only thing I’d recommend is not bragging about which schools or how many schools are on your list. Besides being silly, you don’t want to be embarrassed if you receive rejections from your top-choice school.

Stay humble, college applicants.

When Sharing Isn’t Caring

Let me recommend a line in the sand when it comes to sharing information:

  • Don’t reveal which scholarships you applied to.

Why not share scholarship information? First of all, think about your group of friends. In many ways, they’re like you. They take the same classes as you, probably make similar grades as you, and have similar interests. If you tell them about a scholarship you applied to, they might apply as well, creating more competition for you. And since scholarships tend to have fewer applicants than colleges, one additional application on the pile can lower your chances significantly.

Note: This advice also applies long after your college years. Don’t tell friends or family about the specific jobs where you apply. They might apply, too, and snatch that job away from you.

Supporting Friends as the Acceptances and Rejection Roll In

Once you apply to colleges and scholarships, there’s a lot of waiting, and you and your friends have to go through the motions until you receive the emails or letters that will change your lives forever. But there will come a day when you or a close friend find out the news. How should you react? Let’s look at some positive and negative scenarios.

If the news is bad…

If bad news should befall a friend, know that they’ll be sad or at least grumpy for a few days. Suggest that you do something fun, and more importantly, distracting together. Go to the movies, play mini golf, anything to remind your friend that life goes on.

If the news is good…

It’s time to celebrate! If you’ve received the good news, please don’t gloat over your friends. Gloating’s not nice. If they’ve received the good news, please forgive them if they should gloat. And as I’m sure you’ve (hopefully) already heard, don’t do anything illegal to celebrate. Colleges and scholarships love to rescind acceptances to high school seniors who get into trouble.

Final Thoughts

Besides keeping your scholarship applications a secret and not gloating if you should receive good news, there’s no wrong way to discuss the college application experience with your friends. Be there for them, and they’ll be there for you.

In other words, be a good friend. 🙂

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