Educational Blog

75 POSTS

What Causes School Anxiety? (And What You Can Do)

Anxiety plagues just about every high school student. I could easily create an 800-item list of anxiety triggers you and your peers experience every day, but that would be TOO easy. You know, as I think about the innumerable anxiety culprits wandering your high school and the space between your ears (your brain), a few trends emerge. In this article, we’ll look at the big anxiety categories that plague high school students and what you can do to keep your anxiety at a low simmer.

Deadlines

The first thing that came to mind when I started brainstorming this article was deadlines. Just two feet away from my computer is a dry erase whiteboard calendar jam-packed full of them. Just looking at them gives me the jitters.

But unlike you, I have more than a decade of experience juggling multiple deadlines. Experience alone tells me that everything’s going to work out just fine. But alas, you lack such valuable experience. However, just like everything we’ll discuss in this article, there is something you can do TODAY to make deadline anxiety a thing of the past.

What You Can Do

Imagine a guy who pays $50 for a premium all-you-can-eat buffet. Everything looks great, but he only has so much stomach real estate. He decides to eat large portions of just 1-2 items that attract him. Yes, he has a great meal, but he goes home feeling anxious. Did he get his money’s worth? Maybe, just maybe, he should have sampled a little bit of everything.

Believe it or not, beating deadline anxiety has a lot to do with our gourmand.

As an ambitious high school student, you have a ‘buffet’ of deadlines in your future. When you have the option to either work on one assignment for two to three hours or three assignments for one hour each, always choose the latter. That way, you’ll make progress on every single thing. Yes, in both scenarios you’d do the same amount of work, but by ‘sampling’ everything you’ll actually feel that you accomplished more than if you left something untouched.

Assessments of All Shapes and Sizes

High school is full of assessments: ACT/SAT, AP, IB, pop quizzes, exit slips, unit tests, midterms, end-of-year tests, state tests, etc. That’s a lot of assessments to worry about.

Like with deadlines, you consciously know that you’ll do your best, but anxiety still has its talons in you. What to do? 

What You Can Do

Defeating texting anxiety has more to do with mindset rather than any particular action on your part. In a nutshell, you simply need to remember that for the majority of important high school tests, there are second chances, either retakes or the ability to learn from your mistakes and apply your new knowledge toward the next test. Keep this in mind before taking the ACT/SAT and just about every test you take in class.

Student-Teacher Relationships

I didn’t get along with all my teachers in high school, and when I became a teacher, I didn’t get along with all of my students. Let’s say you have a teacher that, for whatever reason, rubs you the wrong way. Going into his or her class feels like a nightmare. Maybe you’ve lost some sleep over it.

What You Can Do 

As there are so many things that can sour a student-teacher relationship, I’m going to shy away from giving specific advice. However, in just about every case, finding a solution begins with asking yourself “Is it me or my teacher who’s at fault?” Be honest and own up to any mistakes that you might have made. In my experience on both sides of the teacher’s desk, you likely did SOMETHING at SOME POINT to widen the rift even if it wasn’t the original cause.

Once you look at things objectively, it’s time to talk to your teacher, preferably before or after school. That may sound scary, but look at it this way: in just about every kind of relationship, better communication leads to a better relationship. It’s as simple as that.

 Your Peers

Bullies, friends who drift away, mean girls, peer pressure…being around other teenagers 7-8 hours a day can sure raise your anxiety. Of course, if you’re anxious because you or someone you know is experiencing physical or psychological harm due to other students, it’s time to let a teacher know. But if your anxiety is more of the general variety, you can still nip peer anxiety in the bud

What You Can Do 

Like with test anxiety, the answer (mostly) involves perspective. First of all, if you’re worried what people other than your closest friends think of you, don’t. That statement should also apply to your friends, but since you’re at a self-conscious age, you might as well be self-conscious only in regards to people you can trust.

In other words, the opinions held by 99.99% of the people you see every day aren’t worth the powder to blow them to heck.

Final Thoughts

Anxiety is a monster, yes. It can’t ever be truly defeated, but if you take some proactive measures, it’ll spend most of its existence trapped in a cage of your own design. If you have a fall break coming up, use that time to evaluate your anxiety triggers and devise a customized plan.

Finally, nothing beats anxiety more than enjoying the fall weather. Happy Halloween!

Top 10 Colleges in New York

Interested in the top colleges in the state of New York? There are over 60 four year colleges to choose from in the state of New York.

MyKlovr has generated a list of the top 10 colleges in the state of New York.

 

1. Columbia University

Butler Library at Columbia University.

Location: New York, NY

Total Enrollment: 25,084

Acceptance Rate: 7%

Fun Facts

Columbia University was established in 1754.

The MGM Studio‘s Lion was inspired by Columbia’s Lion mascot.

 

2. Cornell University

Cornell University campus.

Location: Ithaca, NY

Total Enrollment: 22,319

Acceptance Rate: 15%

Fun Facts

Cornell University was founded on April 27, 1865.

The chicken nugget was created at Cornell University by Robert C. Baker in the 1950s.

 

3. Colgate University

Colgate University hill panorama.

Location: Hamilton, NY

Total Enrollment: 2,890

Acceptance Rate: 27%

Fun Facts

Colgate University was founded in 1819.

The top three career fields of 2017 Colgate University graduates are Business/management, Communications/media, and Consulting.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Barnard CollegeLiberal Arts2,588New York, NY17%Urban
5New York University University250,550New York, NY32%Urban
6Hamilton CollegeLiberal Arts1,879Clinton, NY26%Rural
7University of RochesterUniversity11,209Rochester, NY38%Suburban
8Vassar CollegeLiberal Arts2,424Poughkeepsie, NY27%Suburban
9Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and ArtLiberal Arts964New York, NY13%Urban
10Rensselaer Polytechnic InstituteUniversity7,442Troy, NY44%Suburban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

Top 10 Colleges in the Midwest

Choosing a college can be very stressful for high school students. Being in high school is hard enough with a full class schedule, extracurriculars, friends, and family.

Luckily, myKlovr has generated a list of the top ten colleges in the Midwest to help narrow down the options.

1. University of Chicago

Harper Library at the University of Chicago.

Location: Chicago, IL

Total Enrollment: 13,322

Acceptance Rate: 8%

Fun Facts

The University of Chicago was founded in 1890.

Popular majors at the University of Chicago include Economics, Political Science and Government, Biology, Mathematics, and Public Policy Analysis.

2. University of Notre Dame

The main building at the University of Notre Dame.

Location: Notre Dame, IN

Total Enrollment: 12,393

Acceptance Rate: 19%

Fun Facts

The University of Notre Dame was founded on November 26, 1842.

The school colors of the University of Notre Dame are blue and gold, the mascot is an Irish Terrier dog.

3. Washington University in St. Louis

Location: St. Louis, MO

Seigle Hall at Washington University in St. Louis.

Total Enrollment: 15,032

Acceptance Rate: 17%

Fun Facts

Washington University in St. Louis was founded on February 22, 1853.

Washington University in St. Louis has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4University of Michigan- Ann ArborUniversity44,718Ann Arbot, MI29%Urban
5Carleton College Liberal Arts2,105Northfield, MN16%Rural
6The University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUniversity46,951Champaign, IL60%Urban
7Grinnell CollegeLiberal Arts1,699Grinnel, IA20%Rural
8University of Wisconsin- MadisonUniversity43,336Madison, WI53%Urban
9Oberlin CollegeLiberal Arts2,912Oberlin, OH28%Suburban
10Case Western Reserve UniversityUniversity11,664Cleveland, OH35%Urban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

Works Well with Others: Why Group Projects Matter

It happens every time: your teacher assigns a group project and puts you with someone who contributes little to nothing. “Oh yeah, just put my name on it.” Lazybones gets full credit for doing zilch. The experience makes you think that group projects should have no part of the modern high school experience.

Yes, group projects as we know them need some tweaks. (There are lots of things teachers can do to ensure that everyone participates, but that’s an article just for them.) At their core, though, group projects matter and can play a valuable role in the learning experience.

If you’ve had a few lousy group projects, don’t stop reading just yet. Let me show you how group project success can have some happy side effects for your present and future selves. 

Group Projects Prepare You for Real Life

No matter what you do for a living, your professional success rides on working well with other people. Even I, working from home, always interact with my clients through email and phone calls. Just like at an office, everyone’s success depends on, you guessed it, everyone being on the same page and working together.

Your career might be 8+ years down the road, so here are a few ways that participating in group projects can help you TODAY:

  • “Works well with others” is an excellent line that college admission counselors want to see in a recommendation letter. That’s why I put it in the title!
  • Group work plays a significant role in extracurricular activities and volunteering.
  • Working in groups exposes you to different viewpoints and personality types.

To expand a bit more on that last point, different personality types means that you’ll regularly come across people whose personality types don’t match yours. Though this difference can cause conflict, it’s also a valuable opportunity to build your interpersonal skills.

Group Projects Build Your Interpersonal Skills

Let’s get back to the group member who does nothing. How would you react to this situation? Would you tattle on him, ignore him, try to engage him, or something else entirely? Your first reaction plays a significant role in how that person approaches the rest of the project. Now, don’t blame yourself if that person won’t budge no matter what, but here are some things to do to show your group project meddle and encourage everyone to do their part:

  • Ask everyone what part of the project matches their strengths or interests.
  • Ask for everyone’s input/advice on how the group should accomplish its goal(s).
  • Split into smaller groups. For example, if your group has four people, pair up to divide the project’s responsibilities. That way, no one can ‘fall through the cracks.’

If someone still won’t participate, don’t escalate the situation, but document what each group member contributed (or didn’t) to the final product.

If you’re not a leader, that fine. As long as you’re a team player, you’ve done your part. After all, you still have plenty of time to hone your leadership skills throughout the rest of high school and college.

Before wrapping up, let’s discuss one final piece of the group project puzzle that should help you long after high school graduation. 

Organization

Group projects require more advanced organizational skills than you might need if you tackled the same project on your own. Although you may consider yourself a master organizer, finding yourself having to track others’ progress and keep up with your own work can challenge even the best students.

There’s an easy way to solve this problem, something that works just as well in the classroom as it will in your future work environment. Imagine your group has a project and that you have three class periods to complete it. At the beginning of the project, have everyone set a goal. Someone in the group writes down each goal. At the end of the period, everyone reports back. Just like before, someone writes down every person’s progress. Some people might have worked ahead, others right on target, and others behind. As you repeat this process for days two and three, you can refer back to these notes to suggest quick and effective solutions:

  • Have someone who worked ahead assist someone who’s behind at the beginning of the next class.
  • Ask the people who are behind to finish up their daily goal as homework.

More importantly, by keeping track of everyone’s progress, it’s impossible to be blindsided by someone not pulling their weight.

Final Thoughts

Group projects aren’t perfect, but they teach you plenty of valuable life skills that can both raise your chances of college admission success and prepare you for just about any work environment.

Top 10 Colleges in the West Coast

There are so many colleges available for students to choose from. It’s best for students to be aware of all their options for when applications come around.

For that reason, myKlovr has generated a list of the top ten colleges on the west coast.

 

1. Stanford University

Overview of Stanford University campus.

Location: Bay Area, CA

Total Enrollment: 16,914

Acceptance Rate: 5%

Fun Facts

Standford University was founded on November 11, 1885.

Stanford University has six schools, Business, Earth Energy and Environmental Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, and Medicine.

 

2. California Institute of Technology

Robert A. Millikan Memorial Library at Caltech.

Location: Pasadena, CA

Total Enrollment: 2,240

Acceptance Rate: 8%

Fun Facts

California Institute of Technology was founded in 1891.

The mascot of Caltech is a beaver, to honor natures engineers.

 

3. Pomona College

Mason Hall, an academic building at Pomona College.

Location: Claremont, CA

Total Enrollment: 1,703

Acceptance Rate: 10%

Fun Facts

Pomona College was founded in 1887.

An alumnus of Pomona college is Art Clokey, the creator of Gumby.

 

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Claremont McKenna CollegeLiberal Arts1,347Claremont, CA9%Suburban
5Harvey Mudd CollegeLiberal Arts829Claremont, CA13%Suburban
6University of California, BerkeleyUniversity40,174Berkeley, CA16%Urban
7University of California, Los AngelesUniversity44,497Los Angeles, CA18%Urban
8University of Southern CaliforniaUniversity43,871Los Angeles, CA17%Urban
9Scripps CollegeLiberal Arts1,057Claremont, CA30%Suburban
10Reed CollegeLiberal Arts1,396Portland, OR35%Suburban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

5 Tips for Finding Success in Group Projects

Group projects, some students like them and some do not! There are both advantages and disadvantages to group projects.

A disadvantage of group projects is if one member slacks, the whole group suffers. Sometimes, one person does most of the work, or the final product is not as complete as it could have been because everyone did not give 100%.

Advantages of group projects are seen most in the final results of the project. If all group members worked together and gave 100%, it will show in the final result, and most likely earn a high grade.

A survey was sent out to myKlovr users asking if they love or hate group projects. Out of 267 responses, 45% like group projects, 46% do not like group projects, and 9% are neutral.

 

Bar graph showing myKlovr survey results.

 

To make the most of group projects, no matter what the circumstances, myKlovr has come up with a list of five tips for students to find success when working in group projects.

1. Organization

  • Setting goals within your group will keep everyone on task and allow for the project to be broken up into smaller pieces.
  • Assigning tasks, give everyone something to do, making sure everything that needs to be done will get done.

2. Communication

  • Stay connected via text, e-mail, or group chats (GroupMe) to have a place where you can reach group members easily to keep everyone on the same page.
  • Listening is an important part of communication, quite literally. There is no point in talking to group members if they are not going to listen.
  • Don’t hesitate to speak up if something is not working or someone isn’t pulling their weight. Squashing the problem ASAP will only help the group in the long run.

3. There is no “I” in “team”

  • Work together, one person can not and should not do all the work. A team or group works best when everyone is giving 100%.
  • Everyone has different perspectives and opinions, use this to your group’s advantage.

4. Accountability

  • Taking ownership when you personally have done something wrong can show your respect to your group members and that you are trying to make it better for the future.
  • Showing responsibility for your work/actions will make the group dynamic run smoother.
  • Don’t be afraid to hold your group members responsible for their deadlines and tasks.

5. Learn

  • Always learn something in whatever you do, either from the topic of the assignment or about how you personally work best in groups.
  • Take note of what has worked and what hasn’t, will make your next group project better than the last.
  • Learning skills from group projects will help you in the professional world later on in life.

 

Group projects are important not only for school assignments but for your future as well. If they seem like a burden now, think about what you will learn in the long run, such as communication, teamwork, and accountability.

Participating in group projects prepare students for the working world/college. Similarly, the assignment may not be interesting or someone in the group may not be your favorite person.

The struggles students face when doing group projects do happen in the real world, but never the less, the project must get done.

How Important Are Extracurricular Activities to College Admissions?

I’ve been around this great big world, and it seems that of all the cultures I’ve come across, the good ole’ U.S. of A. puts the most emphasis on high school students participating in extracurricular activities. Oh sure, high school students in other countries play sports and participate in clubs, but doing so doesn’t have much of an effect on college admissions.

For you see, in the rest of the world a high school student’s chances of getting into a good college rest entirely on grades and test scores, especially the latter. Seriously, being a high school student in some countries is just like that ham-fisted YouTube movie The Thinning, except without the threat of euthanasia because you scored lower than the mean.

So before we dive into the world of extracurricular activities, let us take a moment to appreciate the fact that your academic future isn’t 100% riding on standardized test scores.

*Moment of Appreciation*

That was nice. Now let’s talk extracurriculars, and how you can use any one of them to work for YOU during college admission season.

So which one should I do?

Simple Answer: Something that interests you.

Complex Answer: No matter which extracurricular or two that you pick, doing two things will help set you apart from the bulk of the competition. First, stick with an extracurricular for at least two years. Second, take on a leadership role where you get to show off your responsible/organized side. Consistency and leadership experience under your belt, you’re already a step ahead of the majority of college applicants.

Just the majority? How do I stand out from high achievers like me?

Simple Answer: Apply a personal touch, even if it means creating your own activity.

Complex Answer: If you’re aiming for a top tier school, you’re right to assume that most applicants will have both consistent track records with extracurriculars and hold leadership positions within them. Here’s how you can go a step above:

  • Create a new club, preferably one that does some good for the community. (College admission counselors love applicants who create volunteer organizations.)
  • Take a creative hobby to the next level.
    • Submit a short story for publication. (And get it published somewhere)
    • Submit your photography or artwork to contests.
    • Start your own company. (Think Shark Tank)
    • Take your band on tour over the summer. (But don’t skip school if you should become famous 😉 )

In other words, apply yourself to your passion, whatever it is. Even if you don’t succeed before college application time rolls around, your journey can make for an excellent personal essay.

Okay, my extracurriculars are great. What difference will they make?

Short Answer: They’re a tiebreaker.

Long Answer: Everyone loves a good story, and for college admissions counselors, an engaging story about an extracurricular activity can act as the tiebreaker between two highly qualified applicants. So, at the end of the day, you need extracurriculars just in case. Doesn’t matter if it’s the French club or your second studio album.

What you’re telling me is that extracurriculars are like an insurance policy?

Short Answer: Yep.

Long Answer: With college admissions getting more competitive seemingly by the minute, there’s a good chance that your extracurriculars will come in handy when the admissions counselor at Your Dream School reviews your application. You’ll never know if they were the deciding factor, but you wouldn’t want to be without them.

Final Thoughts

In summary, it matters less what extracurricular activity you choose than how you approach it. Like most things in life, the more you put into it, the more it’ll give back. You’ll make some friends, have fun, and hopefully do a little good in the process.

Let me leave you with some sage advice in the vein of homemaking guru Martha Stewart. “An extracurricular activity: it’s a good thing.”

 

 

Top 10 Colleges in The East Coast

Choosing a college can be overwhelming for high school students when there seems to be a never-ending list of options.  Some schools are small, some are big, there are urban campuses, rural campuses, and some schools are private and some are state schools, the list goes on and on.

If you are unsure of where to even apply to, here is a list of the top ten schools on the east coast generated by myKlovr. It can be beneficial to apply to schools that will challenge you academically and personally.

1. Harvard University

Medical School at Harvard University.

Location: Cambridge, MA

Total Enrollment: 20,324

Acceptance Rate: 5%

Fun Facts

Harvard University was founded on September 8, 1636, and named after its first benefactor, John Harvard.

The first graduation ceremony for Harvard University was in 1642, honoring nine graduates.

2. Yale University

Law School at Yale University.

Location: New Haven, CT

Total Enrollment: 12,458

Acceptance Rate: 6%

Fun Facts

Yale University was founded in 1701 and named after Elihu Yale.

The most popular majors at Yale University are Cellular and Molecular Biology, History, Science and Government, and Psychology.

3. Princeton University

Nassau Hall; the oldest building at Princeton University.

Location: Princeton, NJ

Total Enrollment: 8,181

Acceptance Rate: 7%

Fun Facts

Princeton University was founded in 1746 and named after the town the college is located in, Princeton, New Jersey.

The school colors are black and orange and the school mascot is a Tiger.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUniversity11,376Boston, MA8%Urban
5Columbia UniversityUniversity25,084New York, NY6%Urban
6Brown UniversityUniversity9,781Providence, RI9%Urban
7Duke UniversityUniversity15,928Durham, NC11%Suburban
8Dartmouth CollegeUniversity6,409Hanover, NH11%Rural
9Cornell UniversityUniversity22,319Ithaca, NY14%Rural
10Williams CollegeLiberal Arts2,134Williamstown, MA18%Rural

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

What High School Students Don’t See Coming

This is a guest post written by Kyle Grappone.

There are certain things about high school I remember vividly. Wasting time with my friends, talking to girls, and being the class clown that made everyone laugh. What I don’t remember is being serious, studying hard, or thinking about my life 5-10 years down the line. I didn’t do those things because I didn’t realize that I was supposed to. When you’re in high school, the last thing you think about is being an adult or getting a real job. This is one of the reasons why we have the problems we have today when it comes to thinking about our future.

After working for nearly ten years in the real world, I noticed two distributing trends. One, most of the people I knew and worked with disliked their jobs. Two would be the fact that hating your job was accepted as normal. How is it that so many people disliked not only their jobs but the type of person they had become? After extensive research, I realized that part of the reason this is happening is that this aspect of life is something high school and college students don’t see coming.

This is the motivation and inspiration for my new book To The Next Step. This book is designed to be an instruction manual for students like yourself to get the most out of your education and inspire you to think differently about your future. My goal is to help you avoid becoming one of those adults that have unfulfilled careers and unsatisfied lives.

One of the main messages of my book is that we should get rid of the age-old question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”. I want to eliminate this question because it is fundamentally flawed. How can students like yourself choose what you want to become when you probably don’t even understand the options and choices that are open to you? We need to change this question. You need to start asking yourself, “What type of person do I want to become?”. When you begin thinking about this question, the entire game changes. You will no longer be handcuffed to one occupation but instead opened to the idea of the kind of impact you want to make in the world. You have the power to choose if you’re going to be the type of person who heals, helps, protects, or educates. Now you can begin building this type of person in your mind and make sure that every decision you make enables you to become that person.

The first step you as a high school student can take in becoming the person you want to be is understanding what opportunities you need to take advantage of starting today. You think you want to be the type of person who entertains people, then you should begin networking with the head of the drama department or inquiring about participating in school plays and musical productions. If you find joy in helping people, you should volunteer your time at a nursing home, charity, or other local organizations that benefit the people in your community. This will give you a better understanding of what that type of work is like and will be much more rewarding than working at a local supermarket or a movie theatre.

Another essential step in this journey is to begin determining what you want to get out of your college education. This does not mean choosing a major, but rather making a list of possible majors and letting that narrow down your search. If you know you want to be someone who educates, you should research colleges known for their educational programs. It is also essential to understand the loans you will have to take out and how much you will have to pay back after college. Certain schools may be more expensive, but that does not mean they have better programs. Your goal should not be to go to a big name school, but instead, gain a valuable education at a price you can afford.

Topics such as navigating high school, applying to college, the college experience, life in the real world, and so much more will be addressed in my book. It is truly meant to be a guidebook to navigate students toward becoming the people they want to be and building a life that they love. Please check out the official campaign page and consider placing a pre-order today.

Professions of the Future

When I was a teenager, the career I have now did not exist. Sure, there were freelancers back in the early 2000s, but the idea of any one of them solely using the Internet to find and complete work was but a mere pipe dream. Today, millions of digital nomads around the world make their livings working remotely for one or more companies.

I’m telling you all of this to make an important point: as a teenager, it’s impossible to know what new careers will exist in the future. However, there are some trends that, if they continue, will significantly impact the future of work. In this article, we’ll examine the shape of things to come.

Mobility on the Rise

My dad and granddad both spent their entire careers in offices. Even in the early 1980s, when my dad’s office received its first desktop computers, no one had any idea what this technology would mean for the future of work or the new careers it would create.

Today, millions of workers (including yours truly) don’t ‘go to work’ in the traditional sense. As companies reexamine their needs over the coming years, they may decide to continue shrinking their physical offices and replace them with digital ones. For you, that means less time commuting, more flexibility, and perhaps a better work/life balance.

But everything has a trade-off.

More Workers ‘On Their Own’

 Let’s say that in the next 10 years, millions of more workers become mobile, and you, a recent college graduate, want to take this career route. Unless things change, you will discover that you are responsible for many things that your parents and grandparents did not have to worry about, even if you work as a full-time employee for a single company. In other words, you, the worker, will have to plan your retirement and obtain your health insurance. When it comes to retirement, you can start a retirement account as young as 18. Most IRAs (Roth and Regular) require a minimum $1,000 initial deposit, but then you can add as much or as little you want each year up to the $5,500/year cap.

Considering how much the health insurance field has changed in the last 10 years, I’m not going to make any predictions for the next 10. However, since we’re on the topic of health…

Healthcare Jobs Are on the Rise

 When it comes to the ‘professions of the future that currently exist’ category of careers, look no further than the healthcare industry. Now, I’m not saying that everyone reading this article should earn their M.D.s. However, as America ages, demand for the following jobs should skyrocket in the coming years:

  • Occupational Therapist
  • Registered Nurse
  • Pharmaceutical Researcher
  • Pharmacist

So, if you like the sciences, helping others, and the prospect of a stable, long-term career, look no further than healthcare.

What About Tech?

Nowhere is the nature of work changing more than technology careers. It seems that every day you hear a story where someone makes (or loses) a considerable fortune on the latest Silicon Valley idea. As I’m a relative outsider in the tech world, let’s consult an expert in the field.

*Opens up childhood toy box.*

“Let’s see. Pogs…furbies…gak…here it is! Magic 8-Ball, will the technology industry be as lucrative in 10 years as it is today?”

*shake shake shake*

Don’t count on it.

 *shake shake shake*

 My reply is no

That’s not good. Hmmm…

First of all, I don’t think that the Magic 8-Ball is saying that you shouldn’t go into a technology-related career. If that’s your passion, go for it. However, let me relate a story that might put the Magic 8-Ball’s replies in perspective.

While listening to the radio last week, I heard a story about a Palestinian entrepreneur who had created an IT company to give jobs to Palestinian programmers. Here was the gist of his message: “My programmers are more talented than those in the U.S. or India. U.S. programmers cost $50-$100/hour. Indian programmers cost $25/hour. My programmers cost $15/hour.”

Let’s say that his company succeeds, and in its wake, a thousand more pop up in economically depressed countries. If that happens, salaries for many American IT professionals could plummet in the next 10-15 years.

In other words, technology careers may not be the pot of gold you’ve been led to believe. The same statement may apply to the work environment, too.  😉

But that’s just my educated guess, and you know what, technological advances create new, in-demand careers all the time. But always do your research before committing to an IT career path. (Honestly, this is good advice for any student no matter their academic interests.)

Final Thoughts

“Magic 8-Ball, is it possible that the professions of the future are completely different than what we’ve looked at in this article?”

*shake shake shake*

Yes – definitely.

“So, when today’s high school students enter college, should they develop a flexible skill set to be prepared for the changing nature of work and new job opportunities?”

*shake shake shake*

Without a doubt.

The Magic 8-Ball has spoken. See you later.

10 Tips for Starting the School Year on the Right Foot

Although it’s still blazing hot in most places around the nation, another summer break is coming to an end. For you upcoming freshman, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, that means another year of high school is right around the corner. No matter your grade or course schedule, there are many things you can do to get the year off on the right foot.

In this article, we’ll explore 10 tips to help you make this year a good one. And since I love all my tips equally, please consider the final tip as valuable as the first. 😉

 

1. Join a Club or Sport

Extracurricular activities are a crucial part of your college application portfolio, but they can also be a lot of fun. The key is to find something you enjoy doing. You’ll meet like-minded people and probably make new friends, too.

Upcoming freshman should pay particular attention to this tip for two reasons. The first is that making new friends can significantly lessen the stress associated with transitioning from middle to high school. Second, if the activity you choose isn’t your cup of tea, you can always pick something else next semester or next year.

 

2. Get a Tutor

Was math (or any subject) difficult last year? If so, it’s not going to be any easier this year. If you have the means, enlist a tutor’s help as soon as possible, even before you take your first test.

If tutors are a bit pricey, consider online resources such as Khan Academy to receive some valuable and free help.

 

3. Use a Planner

It’s rare when a college-bound high school student doesn’t have a busy schedule. You may have a lot to do every day, but you don’t need to be disorganized. That’s why you should use a planner.

The key to using a planner is starting one as soon as the school year begins, well before deadlines start piling up. It will be a lifesaver.

 

4. Get to School Early

If you drive to school, consider arriving at least 20 minutes early every day. Despite having to get up earlier (we’ll get to sleep in just a bit), arriving early has many benefits, some of which I can attest to from personal experience.

  • You can receive one-on-one help from a teacher.
    • Always ask in advance. Most teachers are preparing for class up until the last minute.
  • You don’t feel rushed.
  • You get another opportunity to socialize with friends.
  • You have a quiet environment to finish homework or other projects.
  • If all else fails, you can take a nap in your first-period classroom. 🙂

 

5. Get to Sleep Early

I’ll cut to the chase: you high schoolers don’t get enough sleep, and despite all the science, it’s darn near impossible for a teenager to get up early and feel refreshed. How do we fix this? Here’s some no-nonsense advice.

It’s the end of the day, and you’ve just finished up with your homework/chores/whatever. To get to sleep as early as possible…don’t try to fall asleep right away. Take 30 minutes to do something away from a screen. Then, and only then, get into bed. Your mind will be relaxed and ready to sleep. Of course, the sooner you do this every night, the better you’ll feel the next day.

 

6. Take Stock of Your Interests

When you start a new school year, it pays to examine how your interests have changed over the summer. Maybe you found a new passion or realized that an old one no longer interests you. Self-reflection gives you the power to adjust your plans for the future. And if you ‘check in’ with yourself often, adjusting your plans won’t feel like big changes. It’ll be like a natural evolution. In the end, you’ll understand yourself well enough to curate an excellent list of potential colleges.

 

7. Set One (Reasonable) Goal for the Year

Around New Year’s, adults make resolutions: lose weight, get a new job, etc. However, most adults don’t succeed and go back to their old habits or mindsets. If adults can’t accomplish their goals, why should you try to do the same at the beginning of a new school year?

To set a goal and see it through, you have to choose a reasonable goal. Let’s see what sets apart unreasonable and reasonable goals.

Unreasonable Goal

Reasonable Goal

Make straight As all year.Make As and Bs.
Become the captain of the football team.Get on the football team.
Earn $30,000 in college scholarships this year.Earn $15,000 in college scholarships this semester.

To put it another way, you have to give yourself some wiggle room. The more difficult the goal, the easier you are to become discouraged and give up. Let’s look at the final example about scholarships. You may need $30,000 in scholarships to attend college, but if you frame it as a ‘reasonable goal,’ you’ve turned a massive task into a manageable chunk. Also, you may earn more than $15,000 – a morale boost. If you earn less than $15,000, you still have the following semester to make up the difference by sending out more scholarship applications.

 

8. When Doing Homework, Go from Easy to Hard

You just got home. It’s probably late, or it just feels that way after a long, stressful day. The last thing you want to do is homework. But no matter how much you want to ignore it, it’s not going to disappear.

Here’s what you do. Of all the tasks you have to complete, start with whatever’s easiest. By completing it, you will feel motivated to move onto the next hardest thing.

It’s as simple as that.

 

9. Take a Study Hall (If You Need It)

Since we’re on the topic of homework, I want to discuss study halls briefly. Simply put, they can be a lifesaver if you have a course schedule full of AP/IB/honors courses. Writing from experience, that extra 55 minutes to complete homework during the school day can work wonders for your grades, stress level, and general outlook on life.

 

10. Have Some Fun

I was initially going to title this section ‘Plan to Have Some Fun,’ but I realized that would make me sound like more of a square than I am. And as a square, I must reiterate that you should avoid all ‘fun’ that could result in short or long-term repercussions, many of which involve standing in front of a stern-faced adult wearing a black robe.

That concludes my duties as a square. Let’s talk about fun.

Let’s say you’re who l was in high school – schedule full of honors/AP/IB courses, 1-2 extracurricular activities, and lots of other stuff stealing your time. If this describes you, I bet it’s easy to feel that there’s no time for fun ever. Speaking from my experience on both sides of the teacher’s desk, it’s a mindset that’s easy to fall into.

So how do you have fun as a busy, sleep-deprived, stressed-out high school student? You make time for it.

It’s simple advice, but even for adults, very difficult to follow. No matter how much work you have to do or how guilty you might feel about taking time off, you’re worth 30 minutes to one hour a day to do whatever you want to do, either by yourself or with friends/family. The teenagers who have too much ‘fun’ are those who can’t find a balance between work and play. And to be honest, it’s not entirely their fault. Teenage brains aren’t 100% developed.

To sum up, practice taking time for yourself. That’s fun.

 

Final Thoughts

Top 10 lists are a dime a dozen, so it’s understandably difficult to know if any article’s advice is right for you. That being said, try a few of my tips that you think would help you this year. Ultimately, as long as you do your best, you should have the best year possible.

See you in September!

Should You Take Easier Classes to Earn Better Grades?

This time of year, as the clock on summer runs down, you might have the opportunity to review and adjust your class schedule for the upcoming school year. If yours has been a relaxing summer, it’s easy to see words like ‘honors’ and ‘AP’ on your schedule and feel a tinge of nervous anticipation. Man, that’ll be a ton of work. Wouldn’t it be easier if I made my AP courses honors courses and my honors courses regular courses? That way I can make straight As next year. Yeah…

If you have one or more APs on your schedule, you probably already know where this article is going: you should take the more difficult classes. But unlike other articles that offer this advice, I’m going to avoid the ‘You must apply a Puritanical work ethic in high school so you can crush your enemies, also known as your peers, when it comes time to apply to college’ manta other articles espouse. So why should you take more difficult classes? The answer’s easy:

As long as you pass, you have nothing to lose.

Let me explain.

Let’s Break Down the Numbers and Letters

So you’re taking a course load full of honors and APs. That’s great. But oh no! You’ve made a B in an honors class and a C in an AP class one quarter. What will the colleges you apply to think?

They probably won’t care.

Follow my reasoning. First of all, if you get a B or C one quarter, you still have time to fix it in the next quarter and improve your overall semester grade. More importantly, not all letters are created equal. Earning a B in an honors class might as well be an A in a regular class. You can say the same thing about a C in an AP class. The fact that you’re 16/17 years old and passing a college-level class says a ton of positive things about you as a prospective college student.

Let’s take this reasoning one step further. If you make As in honors classes and Bs in AP classes, you’re ahead of the game in more ways than one. In the eyes of college admission counselors, you are a more attractive candidate than every student who made straight As in regular courses.

To put it another way, by taking honors/APs, you get to make some mistakes and get ahead; if you take regular classes and make straight As, others will still surpass you no matter what. Students who take regular level classes to make straight As always lose the college admission game….unless their school doesn’t offer honors or AP courses, which believe it or not, is still the case in some parts of the country.

Gotta Love Grit

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: college admission counselors love grit. Grit says more about a college applicant than GPA, AP scores, or extracurricular activities.

If you take a look at the link in the previous paragraph, you’ll see that teachers around the nation are trying to teach their students grit. As a former teacher, I’m not too sure if you can teach grit like you can teach an academic subject. But it is possible to encourage someone to improve their grit, which is what I’m going to do right now. If you want to up your grit game, do so with something that has nothing to do with school. My suggestion: buy a moderately hard puzzle toy and stick with it until you solve it. Oh, it’ll frustrate and confuse you, but that’s the point. You have to strengthen your grit muscles if you want to excel in your classes next year.

Being Bored Stinks

Just think about it: being stuck in 6-7 courses that are way too easy, the clock ticking away at an agonizingly slow rate…

I think I’ve made my point.

Final Thoughts

Instead of the standard wrap up, I want to end this article by discussing a BIG EXCEPTION to the advice I’ve given in this article. Over the last decade, more and more high schools have started to offer 1-2 APs to incoming freshmen. This situation doesn’t sit right with me. Except in the very rarest of circumstances, high-achieving students still need a year to adjust to high school before they can tackle APs. By all means, take as many honors courses as you want to your freshman year. Strengthen those grit muscles and grow up a bit before jumping into APs as a sophomore.

Good luck in the coming year!

Top 50 Best Colleges in the United States: myKlovr 2018 Rankings

Your virtual college counselor has arranged a list of 2018’s 50 best colleges and universities in the U.S. MyKlovr arranged a ranking-scale by combining the average ranking and data of some of the most reliable college rankings, including sources such as the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Niche, and more.

 

1) Harvard University

  • Location: Cambridge, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 29,652
  • College Type: Private

The oldest institute of higher learning in the country, Harvard is well known for its political science, social science, and law programs. With a beautiful campus and an 87% graduation rate in the standard four years, Harvard is the most prestigious and sought after university in the country.

 

2) Stanford

  • Location: Stanford, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 16,980
  • College Type: Private

Known for their Computer Science program, Stanford enrolls nearly 17,000 students with average ACT scores hovering between 31 – 36 points. Stanford’s location, close in proximity to Silicon Valley is a great incentive for living arrangements for many applicants.

 

3) Yale University

  • Location: New Haven, CT
  • Student Enrollment: 12,385
  • College Type: Private

Yale University is arguably the most selective Ivy League school with a rich history, tight community, and impressive alumni organization. Yale is also the alma mater of 5 U.S. presidents and 20 living billionaires.

 

4) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Location: Cambridge, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 11,311
  • College Type: Private

Opened up to students in 1865 after the Civil War, MIT, is worldwide leader in physical sciences, engineering, economics, and biology.

 

5) California Institute of Technology

  • Location: Pasadena, California
  • Student Enrollment: 2,255
  • College Type: Private

CalTech is best known for their prestigious engineering program, social life, sports teams, and famous beaver mascot. The extremely small student body can be extremely appealing or problematic to potential applicants depending upon their individual interests.

 

6) University of Pennsylvania

  • Location: Philadelphia, PA
  • Student Enrollment: 24,876
  • College Type: Private

Upenn’s motto is “Leges sine moribus vanae,” meaning “Laws without morals are useless.” The competitive, yet respected reputation, as well as the city-feel location of this Ivy-League school is a huge reason why Upenn receives well over 37,000 applications each year.

 

7) Princeton University

  • Location: Princeton, NJ
  • Student Enrollment: 8,143
  • College Type: Private

Formerly known as the college of New Jersey in the 1800’s, Princeton is well known for their Econ concentration. It is no surprise that they also have a phenomenal financial aid program, graduating 83% of their students without student debt.

 

8) Duke University

  • Location: Durham, NC
  • Student Enrollment: 15,984
  • College Type: Private

With a shockingly small faculty to student ratio of 7:1, The majority of Duke’s students are enrolled in the graduate school. With a wide variety of majors to choose from, Duke is known for their top-tier athletic teams and facilities, including their lacrosse team who has won 3 national championships.

 

9) University of Chicago

  • Location: Chicago, IL
  • Student Enrollment: 15,391
  • College Type: Private

The university is composed of the College, various graduate programs and committees organized into five academic research divisions and seven professional schools. The University of Chicago scholars have played a major role in the development of many academic disciplines, including sociology, literary criticism, religion, and more.

 

10) Dartmouth College

  • Location: Hanover, NH
  • Student Enrollment: 6,350
  • College Type: Private

Dartmouth provides 57 majors for their students throughout their quarter plan. The most popular of these majors are Economics and Political Science. Dartmouth also has a unique Center for Professional Development, in which faculty members work with students and employers to achieve post-graduate success.

 

11) Rice University

  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Student Enrollment: 6,719
  • College Type: Private

With a competitive acceptance rate and 6:1 faculty to student ratio, Rice places great emphasis and support on academic achievement, as well as their sports teams, including their 14 Division one programs and wide variety of intramural sports.

 

12) Brown University

  • Location: Providence, RI
  • Student Enrollment: 9,458
  • College Type: Private

With an incredibly long history, Brown was the first school in the Ivy League, 7th oldest college in the country, and the first to admit students regardless of their religious affiliation. The unique city of Providence is also another reason many students chose to apply here.

 

13) University of Notre Dame

  • Location: Notre Dame, IN
  • Student Enrollment: 12,292
  • College Type: Private

Most Notre Dame students live on campus, hovering around 80% of the student-body. This is huge factor in the incredible turn-outs of their sporting events at Notre Dame Stadium, specifically football games, seating over 80,000 fans. Popular majors include finance, marketing, and accounting.

 

14) Vanderbilt

  • Location: Nashville, TN
  • Student Enrollment: 12,567
  • College Type: Private

Located in the middle of Nashville, Vanderbilt is known for their strong curriculum and upstanding reputation. Vanderbilt accepts students with average SAT scores between 1,430-1,580 and ACT scores between 32-36.

 

15) Washington University in St. Louis

  • Location: Lexington, VA
  • Student Enrollment: 2,172
  • College Type: Private

Named after George Washington and Robert E. Lee, W&L offers a wide variety of majors and minors. Their school motto is Non Incautus Futuri, meaning not unmindful of the future.

 

16) Amherst College

  • Location: Amherst, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 1,849
  • College Type: Private

Amherst is often referred to as the best liberal arts college in the country. Their academic reputation, political engagement, and scenic campus is a large factor in why students choose this school over many Ivy-League schools.

 

17) Georgetown University

  • Location: Washington, DC
  • Student Enrollment: 18,459
  • College Type: Private

Offering around 50 majors, Georgetown is made up of 9 grad and under-grad schools. They are best known for their Economics, Political Science, and Finance programs. They are also regarded as having a very active student body, especially when it comes to their sports teams.

 

18) Harvey Mudd College

  • Location: Claremont, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 800
  • College Type: Private

With an extremely small student body, Harvey Mudd’s mission is fairly simple and straight forward. As a liberal arts college, they aim to educate future mathematicians, engineers, and scientists. In fact, they have one of the best engineering programs in the nation.

 

19) University of California – Berkley

  • Location: Berkley, California
  • Student Enrollment: 40,154
  • College Type: Public

Often considered as the best public school in the country, UC Berkley specializes in Social Sciences, Engineering, Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies, and Mathematics and Statistics. Although the school has a massive student body, 52.3 percent of its classes have fewer than 20 students. It is also interesting to note that the average freshman retention rate, an indicator of student satisfaction, is 97 percent.

 

20) Swarthmore College

  • Location: Swarthmore, PA
  • Student Enrollment: 1,581
  • College Type: Private

Founded by Quakers in 1864, Swarthmore was one of the first coeducational schools in the U.S. It has an 89% four-year graduation rate. They also have a very small student-to-faculty ratio of roughly 8:1, giving students plenty of face to face exposure with their professors.

 

21) Williams College

  • Location: Williamstown, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 2,171
  • College Type: Private

Known as being one of the oldest and most prestigious colleges in the U.S., Williams was founded in 1793. They are also known for meeting 100% of admitted students’ financial needs.

 

22) University of Michigan – Ann Arbor

  • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
  • Student Enrollment: 43,651
  • College Type: Public

Michigan has an extremely unique curriculum when it comes to choosing fields of interests. Their most popular majors include more general studies such as Business, Economics, Psychology, and Computer Sciences. They also have a flourishing social scene that revolves around their top-notch sports programs including football, hockey, and basketball.

 

23) Johns Hopkins University

  • Location: Baltimore, MD
  • Student Enrollment: 22,686
  • College Type: Private

Founded in 1876, Johns Hopkins is known for their incredible medical school. It is no wonder that their most popular undergraduate majors are Nursing, Public Health, and Biomedical Engineering. Many students here have a lot of pride in their school and sports teams, specifically the lacrosse team.

 

24) Carnegie Mellon University

  • Location: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania
  • Student Enrollment: 13,503
  • College Type: Private

Carnegie Mellon is known for its programs in science and technology, but its seven schools and colleges include the College of Fine Arts and the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. They are also known for their acclaimed grad-programs.

 

25) Tufts University

  • Location: Medford, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 11,137
  • College Type: Private

Tufts has a slim 16.1% acceptance rate. There is also a 9:1 student to faculty ratio at this university, creating a small, yet close culture. Their mascot, Jumbo the Elephant is very popular among their student-body and athletic programs.

 

26) Pomona College

  • Location: Claremont, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 1,663
  • College Type: Private

The top 4 most popular majors at Pomona are Economics, Mathematics, Biology, and Neuroscience. As you would guess, the student to faculty ratio and the class sizes are extremely small. It is also interesting to note that the average SAT and ACT scores for admitted students fall around the 95th percentile.

 

27) Claremont Mckenna College

  • Location: Claremont, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 1,349
  • College Type: Private

With a huge emphasis on academic achievement and athletic support, Claremont McKenna College was originally an all-boys college, but opened their doors to women in in the 70’s. For whatever reason, their men’s sports teams play as the Stags, while the women play as the Athenas.

 

28) University of California – Los Angeles

  • Location: Los Angeles, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 41,908
  • College Type: Public

At UCLA, the two most popular majors are Political Science and Psychology. They also have a phenomenal Economics program which is very popular among under-grads. The LA location is also a large factor in why students chose this University.

 

29) United States Military Academy

  • Location: West Point, VA
  • Student Enrollment: 4,348
  • College Type: Public

Students come to Army from all over the country to follow their code “a cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.” interestingly, the Cadets have a 93% first-year retention rate and an extremely small faculty to student ration, allowing for plenty of hands-on learning and engagement with USMA educators.

 

30) Carleton College

  • Location: Northfield, Minnesota
  • Student Enrollment: 2,105
  • College Type: Private

Carleton has a rural setting with a campus size of 955 acres. It utilizes a trimester-based academic calendar and ranks as the 8th best Liberal Arts College in the 2018 edition of Best Colleges. Tuition and fees hover around $52,782 a year.

 

31) United States Naval Academy

  • Location: Annapolis, MD
  • Student Enrollment: 4,525
  • College Type: Public

Located a little over 30 miles away from Washington D.C., Navy has an incredible 98% first-year retention rate and an 8:1 student-to-faculty ratio. Students love to support the blue and gold at their division one sporting events, including football and basketball.

 

32) University of Virginia

  • Location: Charlottesville, VA
  • Student Enrollment: 23,883
  • College Type: Public

UVA specializes in liberal arts studies and business as their students’ most preferred majors. They also have an amazing alumni association. Olympians, astronauts, and U.S. political leaders have all graduated from the University of Virginia.

 

33) Haverford College

  • Location: Haverford, PA
  • Student Enrollment: 1,233
  • College Type: Private

Haverford offers a wide variety of majors. The most popular include Psychology, Biology, Economics, and English. The average SAT scores range between 1,350-1,530.

 

34) Emory University

  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Student Enrollment: 13,788
  • College Type: Private
  • year or above

Heavily affiliated with the United Methodist Church, Emory is one of the oldest private Universities in the country. Emory specializes in Business Administration and Management.

 

35) Middlebury College

  • Location: Middlebury, VT
  • Student Enrollment: 2,558
  • College Type: Private

This liberal arts school has a competitive 17.4% acceptance rate and has an 8:1 student to faculty ratio. With a beautiful north eastern campus and close-knit community, Middlebury has a 97% first year retention rate, a great indicator of freshmen satisfaction.

 

36) United States Air Force Academy

  • Location: USAFA, CO
  • Student Enrollment: 4,111
  • College Type: Public

All cadets at Air Force participate in intercollegiate or intramural athletics, a specialized leadership curriculum, and an intense training program. The Academy’s mission is “to educate, train, and inspire men and women to become leaders of character, motivated to lead the United States Air Force in service to our nation.”

 

37) University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill

  • Location: Chapel Hill, NC
  • Student Enrollment: 29,084
  • College Type: Public

UNC is tied with two other colleges as the oldest public university in the United States, dating back to 1795. Students can participate in over 550 officially recognized student organizations and are known for their talented sports teams, beautiful facilities, and strong social scenes and events.

 

38) Wellesley College

  • Location: Wellesley, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 2,510
  • College Type: Private

One of the original Seven Sisters Colleges, Wellesley is arguably one of the most famous women’s colleges in the world. Notable alumni include Katharine Lee Bates, Diane Sawyer, and Hillary Clinton. Their most preferred major is Economics.

 

39) New York University

  • Location: New York, NY
  • Student Enrollment: 50,027
  • College Type: Private

NYU is an extremely culturally diverse and international university that offers a wide variety of majors. They have campuses in Abu Dhabi, Shanghai, Accra, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, London, Madrid, Paris, Prague, New York City, Sydney, and Washington D.C. NYU also has an impressive list of notable alumni, including CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, Olympians, heads of state, astronauts, and more.

 

40) Davidson College

  • Location: Davidson, NC
  • Student Enrollment: 1,784
  • College Type: Private

Known as the Wildcats, Davidson students have an average SAT score of 1,280–1,430. Their motto is “Let learning be cherished where liberty has arisen,” which is instilled among their high-achieving students and strong reputation.

 

41) Wake Forest University

  • Location: Winston-Salem, NC
  • Student Enrollment: 7,591
  • College Type: Private

Located just a few hours from the Blue Ridge Mountains and beaches of South Carolina, Wake Forest has a beautiful campus that offers intramural sports and plenty of outdoor trips.  Of the 6 schools that make up Wake Forest, the School of Law, School of Business, and School of Medicine are extremely competitive. Undergraduates are enrolled in either Wake Forest College or the business school.

 

42) College of William and Mary

  • Location: Williamsburg, VA
  • Student Enrollment: 8,484
  • College Type: Public

William and Mary has more than 30 undergraduate programs and more than 10 graduate and professional degree programs. Of their highly ranked grad schools, the first law school in the U.S. is one of them. William and Mary is also responsible for the nation’s first academic Greek society, Phi Betta Kappa.

 

43) Colgate University

  • Location: Hamilton, NY
  • Student Enrollment: 2,882
  • College Type: Private

Colgate’s academic departments and majors fall into one of four general divisions: humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, social sciences and university studies. Greek life plays a significant role in student life, representing nearly half of sophomores, juniors and seniors.

 

44) Boston College

  • Location: Chestnut Hill, MA
  • Student Enrollment: 14,354
  • College Type: Private

Boston College, founded in 1863 by the Society of Jesus is a Jesuit Catholic school that has been classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a university with high research activity. BC is made up of nine schools, including grad-programs, and competes in nearly 30 NCAA Division I varsity sports.

 

45) Lehigh University

  • Location: Bethlehem, PA
  • Student Enrollment: 7,119
  • College Type: Private

Lehigh is considered one of the twenty-four Hidden Ivies in the Northeastern U.S. They have four colleges: the P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business and Economics, and the College of Education. The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest, which roughly consists of 40% of their students.

 

46) Santa Clara University

  • Location: Santa Clara, CA
  • Student Enrollment: 8,680
  • College Type: Private

Santa Clara is the oldest currently operating institution of higher education in California and offers a wide variety of majors, as well as 17 varsity athletic programs competing at the division one program. Students at this highly selective school tend to have ACT scores between 27–32 and SAT scores between 1,220–1,410.

 

47) Vassar College

  • Location: Poughkeepsie, NY
  • Student Enrollment: 2,436
  • College Type: Private

Vassar college is a top-tier liberal arts college that offers over 100 clubs and organizations for students to get involved with. Almost all students live on campus in 1 of 12 resident halls. Vassar has a solid 90% four-year graduation rate, and a 94% first year retention rate.

 

48) Barnard College

  • Location: New York, NY
  • Student Enrollment: 2,573
  • College Type: Private

Barnard College is comprised of two schools, offering a small, yet strong liberal arts school and a large, coeducational Ivy League institution, both in NYC. Barnard is an all-female college in Manhattan with a co-ed partnership with Columbia University, across the street.

 

49) Bucknell University

  • Location: Lewisburg, PA
  • Student Enrollment: 3,625
  • College Type: Private

Bucknell, being a very diverse institution offers nearly 50 majors and over 60 minors. Bucknell’s most popular are Economics, Political Science, Accounting, Finance, and Biology. They have an impressive first year retention rate of 93%.

 

50) Colby College

  • Location: Waterville, ME
  • Student Enrollment: 1815
  • College Type: Private

Colby’s campus encompasses a wildlife refuge and is close in proximity to a preserved lakefront property for environmental studies. There are approximately 100 student-run clubs and organizations on campus, ranging from the Colby Ballroom Dance Club to the Society Organized Against Racism. More than one-third of students are members of Colby’s intercollegiate varsity sports teams, the Mules.

 

So there you have it, top 50 colleges and universities in the U.S. ranked by myKlovr. If you are still not sure what schools to apply to, check out our college finder to find your perfect match today!

 

Sources:

 

College Fun Facts

Good day, loyal myKlovr readers. As we’re in the dog days of summer, the standard advice column doesn’t seem right. Instead, let’s beat the heat with some college fun facts!

Don’t Waste Your Plague Break

When you think of unexpected breaks from school, images of snow, flooding, or other inclement weather might come to mind. However, disease can have the same effect. Every year, flu season shuts down school districts across the nation.

But did you know that back in the day, college students got out of school for bubonic plague? It’s true, and the story of what one student did with his plague break changed the world forever.

The year was 1665, and Jolly Olde England was suffering from the plague. Cambridge University had to shut its doors for a year. At the time, Isaac Newton had just started his graduate education. Like the other students, Isaac was forced to return to his family home. But did he spend the next year just sitting around playing Fortnite? Well…of course not. Fortnite didn’t exist back then. Electricity didn’t exist back then. Duh.

So what did Isaac Newton do with his time? Oh, not much. He just invented a little thing called Calculus and worked on his theory of gravity. So the next time you want to thank a falling apple for Newton’s grand revelation, thank the plague instead. And whenever you get another unexpected day off from school, make Isaac proud by getting out there and curing cancer. 😉

The Ivy League Exists Because of Football

If you attend an Ivy League school, there’s a good chance that you’ll see some actual ivy. However, the Ivy League did not get its name due to the reputation of its schools or the large amount of ivy that grows on the members’ campuses.

It was all about football.

You see, a long, long time ago (the 1930s), the eight schools that make up the Ivy League got together to form an athletic league. Even back then, each Ivy League school was already well known for its academics. So thank football, and not the mystical powers of ivy to imbue students with knowledge, for the Ivy League.

You Thought American Colleges Were Big

America sure has some big colleges. The University of Central Florida comes out at just over 55,000 undergraduates. Phew. That’s more people than the town where I grew up! But UCF doesn’t hold a candle to the biggest university in the world: Indira Gandhi National Open University. How much bigger than UCF are we talking about? Twice as big? Ten times as big? Twenty times as big?

Try 72 times as big. That’s over 4,000,000 students. Thankfully, students take courses online or through the mail. Can you imagine the commute to that campus?

Movies About College Are Sweet, Sweet Lies

When I was a kid, I watched a bunch of Saved by the Bell. Even then, I wondered how the characters could spend so much time talking in the halls. Didn’t they have classes to go to? When I got to high school, I found out that Saved by the Bell and other TV shows about high school were lies. I only had minutes to run between classes among hundreds of other loud, pushy teenagers.

Unfortunately, college movies are just the same: sweet, sweet lies. Sorry, readers, but in real life, the same fate would befall Van Wilder, Frank the Tank, and every member of Delta House:

They would all be rotting in a federal penitentiary.  🙁

The Birth of the Hot Pocket – Sort Of

When you earn your bachelor’s degree, the graduation garb is fairly straightforward: jet black muumuu and a cardboard hat. On the other end of the spectrum, graduates earning their doctorates wear fancy robes with stripes and all sorts of colors that scream ‘Look at me! I spent so much money on this degree!’

The outfit for graduates earning their master’s degrees is somewhere in between. However, the sleeves contain small pockets that extend past the cuffs. Why are they there?

Potato storage.

The story goes that back in the day master’s graduates were so poor that they had no other way to transport food but in their clothes. Thus potato pockets were born. So when you get your master’s degree, don’t feel bad if you get weird looks when you whip out a loaded baked potato during the graduation ceremony.

Hey, it’s a long ceremony. Why should you go hungry?

Final Thoughts

Well, myKlovr readers, I hope this article has enlightened you a bit about the stranger side of the college experience. That being said, get some rest during these final days of summer. If your high school schedule for the coming year includes a lot of honors, AP, or IB courses, you’ll need your rest.

What Are College Tiers?

It’s summer, which means that up-and-coming high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors like you are going on college tours and performing other important work that will increase your chances of college admission success.

As you’re performing research into different schools, I bet you’ve come across the term ‘college tier,’ such as “You should apply to a few second-tier schools in addition to your top choices,” or “Going to a third-tier school is a waste of money.”

In a nutshell, college tiers resemble the tiers in the cereal aisle. On the top shelf are the name-brand cereals, and with that name brand comes a high price. On the middle shelf are the lesser-known cereals and the generic, store-brand varieties. Finally, on the bottom shelf are low-priced bulk cereals. You know the ones – they come in big plastic bags.

In this article, we’ll take a trip down the “college aisle” to examine the different tiers. While there we’ll discuss why a college ends up in a particular tier and if tiers say anything about the quality of education students receive.

The Tiers: A Breakdown

First off, there are four college tiers. Let’s learn a little about each one:

  • Tier 1: Private schools that invest as much (or more) in research than educating undergraduates
    • Cost to Attend: $40,000-$50,000/year
  • Tier 2: Private liberal arts colleges that do not focus on research
    • Cost to Attend: $30,000-$40,000/year
  • Tier 3: Major public research universities
    • Cost to Attend: $10,000-$30,000/year
  • Tier 4: Every other college including each state’s community college system
    • Cost to Attend: $0-$30,000/year

Something interesting to note is that before the mid-1980s, the concept of college tiers didn’t exist. What was just a term used by statisticians became a successful marketing ploy that big-name colleges use to build their brands.

So if tiers are mostly about marketing, will they impact your life during and after college?

What Tiers Mean for You

If you have plans to earn a master’s or doctoral degree, then college tiers matter when you’re applying to graduate school. In a nutshell, graduate programs at tier 1 and 2 schools want applicants who earned their bachelor’s degrees from tier 1 and 2 schools. The reasons for this are two-fold. First of all, when reviewing applicants that graduated from tier 1 and 2 schools, admission counselors know that the quality of education these applicants received was on par with or exceeded that of the programs at their university. Secondly, it looks better for them if they accept more candidates from these schools. But if you’re not planning to go beyond your bachelor’s, then it doesn’t matter where you receive your degree.

No matter your final level of education, where you earned your degree quickly falls in significance compared to your on-the-job performance after graduation. Apply this line of thinking to the colleges and universities on your short list by considering the questions below:

Tiers 1 & 2 

  • Will attending mean that I go into debt?
    • If the answer is ‘yes,’ you may want to reconsider.
  • Despite the school’s big name and reputation, does it offer academic programs that interest me?
    • This is also a vital tier 3 and 4 question.

Tiers 3 & 4 

  • Does this program provide a good education?
    • Research what former students are saying about their experiences. Although the college landscape has improved in the last few years, there are still many ‘colleges’ that do a poor job educating students or rip them off.
  • Am I interested in starting my degree at one of these schools before transferring to a tier 1 or 2 school?
    • Many undergraduates choose this route to save money on their educations.

Final Thoughts

If you aspire to a career in academia, then yes, college tiers matter a lot. If other career paths interest you, college tiers take a backseat to other factors such as your ability to pay. So don’t let advertising alone reel you in. Do your research, and apply to the colleges and universities where you can get the best bang for your buck.

The Importance of Summer Vacation

Summer vacation is a fantastic time: 10 weeks when just about anything is possible every single day. For some of you, retaking a standardized test, going on college tours, or even beginning to write your college essays will use up some of your time. I want to use this article to challenge you to do something beyond the standard list of summer activities:

Have a transformational experience.

You see, admission counselors like applicants who are not only open to new experiences but also recognize that even the smallest experience can change one’s life forever. This may seem like small potatoes compared to the importance put on standardized test scores and grades, but think of it another way. For most young people, going to college is the most significant transformational experience of their lives up until that point. Admission counselors want students who will embrace change and leave a positive impact on their college community.

So where do you find transformational experiences during the summer?

Short answer: just about everywhere.

Long answer: in this article, we’ll explore two ways you can find an experience that will leave its mark on you forever. You’ll also learn how to discuss this experience in your college essays.

Travel

Out of all the transformational experiences out there, travel ranks at or near the top. Going to a new continent, country, state, or even town can tweak your worldview and overall look on life. To put it another way, you don’t need to walk on the Great Wall of China or stand at the top of the Eiffel Tower for you to have an epiphany about life, the world, and everything.

Here’s What You Do

I bet you have at least one trip planned for this summer. Let’s use it as our example. From the moment you leave home, PAY ATTENTION TO EVERYTHING. Even if your memory is an iron trap, bring along a journal and chronicle your days on the road, air, or sea. Not only will journaling help you better appreciate your experience, but it’ll also come in handy when it comes time to write your college essays.

So what do you do besides writing down observations? Easy: get out of your comfort zone. If you’re going to a new city, take a walking tour with no route in mind, or get off the subway at a random stop and see what’s near the station. It’s through this kind of exploration that people stumble upon great restaurants, amazing sights, and unexpected adventures. And since I mentioned food, try a local dish. Who knows, you may love it.

“But I’m not going on any trips!”

If you don’t have anything planned, or money is an issue, consider applying to one of the many travel programs that help high school students travel the nation and the world. Your school may have a partnership with one of these programs. If not, here are two organizations that award travel scholarships to students with financial need.

  • Global Navigator Scholarship: CIEE is one of the most respected programs that help American high school and college students study abroad. CIEE offers more than a dozen summer travel opportunities that last 3-4 weeks. The Global Navigator scholarship covers 20-50% of the total cost. (I wholly recommend CIEE, as they coordinated my study-abroad program when I was in college.)
  • School Tours of America: School Tours of America provides funding to students that go towards a School Tours of America tour within the United States. In addition to these scholarships, the website includes links to scholarship boards exclusive to students who want to travel during the summer.

So yes, there are options for you to travel no matter your family’s financial situation.

Volunteering & Internships

So maybe travel isn’t your thing. That’s fine. In this section, let’s discuss how volunteering and internships can help you have a transformational experience.

Finding Somewhere to Volunteer or Intern 

Right off the bat, college admission counselors love applicants with volunteer or internship experience. Just as important, though, is where an application chooses to volunteer or intern. What this means for you is that you should aim for something that fits your interests. Want to help the needy? Volunteer at a food bank. Want to enact change at the local or state level? Volunteer with a political organization. Aspire to specific career after college? Intern with a local company in that field.

Once You Start Work 

It’s impossible to journal when you work, so write journal entries at the end of each day you volunteer or intern. You might realize that you like the work more (or less) than you initially thought. That’s the kind of realization that makes for a transformational experience.

Finally, when the internship or volunteer experience ends, it never hurts to ask your manager or supervisor if they would write you a letter of recommendation for your college application portfolio. 🙂

Writing Your College Essays

Just about every college essay has a prompt. However, all of them boil down to one fundamental question: Could you tell us about yourself? Invest some time to brainstorm how to link your experience with the prompt. In most cases, the experience will come up as an example to prove a more significant point. Here’s an example using a typical college essay topic:

What do you want your future roommate to know about you?

“I would like my roommate to know I am open to new experiences. For example, last summer I [insert transformational experience story here.]”

Wasn’t that easy?

Final Thoughts

As someone with a few transformational experiences his belt, I encourage you to get out there this summer and discover what the world has to offer. Don’t worry; I promise that there will still be plenty of time to lounge on the couch, go swimming, and eat a few hot dogs on the 4th of July.

How to Help Your Parents Help You with College Admissions

The early 1990s were an exciting time. America had won the Cold War. Trappers Keepers were the bane of elementary school teachers around the country. (Teachers hated them because of the noisy velcro.) And on the news, reporters were talking about a newfangled technology called the Internet.

Why am I waxing on about part of a decade that I was too young to remember? It’s to get across the fact that a lot has changed since the days when airports and hotels were full of payphones. And your parents, who probably went to college in the early 90s, aren’t up to speed on how the college application process has evolved since then.

In this article, we’ll examine how you can help your parents help you. That phrase may seem a bit contradictory (or just confusing), but let me convince that if you invest a little time educating your parents about how applying to college works in 2018, they will become fully prepared to help you gain admission to your dream college.

Why Bother?

You ever know someone who had good intentions but made things worse because they didn’t know what they were doing? If you don’t educate your parents about modern college admissions, you and they may fall into the same trap. Also, since they’re family, your relationships might become strained as a result.

There’s a lot of risks involved keeping your parents in the dark. Let’s change that. The sooner you get started, the sooner your parents will be able to bring their skills to the table knowledgeably and productively.

What to Bring Up

The path to college has changed a lot in the last 25 years. Going over everything with your parents would take forever, so at a minimum, hit the following high notes when you talk to them.

Acceptance Rates Have Plummeted

When your parents applied to college, there were plenty of colleges and universities that were difficult to get into. Back then the Ivy League was closed off to all but the super smart or well connected.

In 2018, getting into any one of the top 75 colleges/universities is just as tricky as it was to get into the Ivy League 25 years ago. And with more high school seniors reaching for those top colleges every year, the odds of getting in are ever dwindling. When I graduated Vanderbilt in 2008, it was a running joke that no one in the class of 2008 would have been accepted for the class of 2012.

How do you get this point across to your parents? Show them the admissions data from their colleges since they graduated. Even if they attended a public college or university, you would still discover the trend I described in the previous paragraph.

Tuition Has Skyrocketed

If your parents went to a private college, they should know from experience that college can be pricey. Even so, tuition just about everywhere has gone through the roof. Like with acceptance rates, convey this information to your parents through a few relevant examples. If you haven’t already, now would be a great time to discuss just how much financial support your parents are willing to give you when you go to college.

(Just About) Everything’s Done Online

When I applied to college in the fall of 2003, about 50% of everything I submitted was done online. Today it’s approaching 100%. Don’t be surprised if some colleges ask for digital copies of your transcripts.

Once you have finished your college list, tell your parents how the application process works for each school. This way they will better understand and be able to help you throughout the process. Making them members of your myKlovr support team doesn’t hurt either. 😉

Standardized Test Scores Ain’t What They Used to Be

Your parents took the SAT/ACT when they were high school students. Yes, the tests have changed in the last 25 years, but not so much that your parents couldn’t recognize the modern versions. Also, your parents may even be able to help you prepare for the Reading or English sections. I wouldn’t count on Math, though. Everybody forgets high school Math.

The biggest change your parents should recognize is that the way college admissions counselors view these tests has changed significantly over the past 25 years. Back then, an impressive SAT/ACT score was a golden ticket to admissions success. Since then, the growing number of applicants along with the ballooning test-prep industry has made the value of a perfect or near-perfect score fall faster than a meteor falling to Earth.

What does this mean for you and your parents? The main point you need to get across to them is that yes, SAT/ACT scores still matter, but their importance has shrunk A LOT in the past quarter-century. Stress that college admissions counselors, especially those at the most competitive schools, want to see well-rounded candidates who excel in the academic, extracurricular, and community realms.

Benefits

So you’ve caught your parents up to speed, and they’re still willing to help out. That’s great! Here are a few crucial ways they can assist you throughout the process:

  • Buying organizational materials such as folders or organizational apps for your phone/computer.
  • Proofreading college essays or investing in Grammarly (or a similar app).
  • Hiring a standardized test or subject-specific tutor.
  • Researching scholarship opportunities.
  • Teaching you financial planning tips to budget for college expenses.

Final Thoughts

A little knowledge goes a long way. For you, imparting a little knowledge to your parents about the modern college admissions experience can go a long way to help you get into your dream college. Along with your parents, be sure to invite other trusted adults to your myKlovr support team. Over the following months (or years if you’re still a high school underclassman), use these adults as valuable resources.

Last, but certainly not least, happy beginning of summer break! 🙂

Juniors! Use Summer Break to Starting Writing Your College Essays

It’s May, which means the school year is winding down like a neglected grandfather clock. The days are warmer, the seconds seem to tick by slower, and the only reason high school students like you endure it at all is that summer break is just a few short days away.

For you juniors reading this article, the next few months will be your last summer break as a high school student. By all means, indulge in some rest and relaxation. However, if applying to college is on your radar, you need to set aside some time for activities that will increase your chances of college admission success. For some students, these proactive steps include college tours and retaking the SAT or ACT. These activities may also apply to you, too, but I want to discuss something else entirely: getting a head start on your college admissions essays.

Though I understand your distaste at the prospect of writing one or more essays over the summer, let me use this article to convince you that summer break is the perfect time to write the first draft.

Why Not Wait?

To be honest, I didn’t start writing my college admissions essays until the fall of my senior year. And as a result, they weren’t that great. To this day I still believe that the University of Chicago rejected my application due to my poor, hastily written essays. Also, admissions essays were just one of the dozens of things I was juggling that fall: AP/IB courses, ACT/SAT retakes, keeping everything organized, etc.

Learn from my mistake: start early. The more time you can commit to college application essays during the summer will translate into both better essays and a less stressful fall semester.

Distractions Are at a Minimum

Initially, I was going to write “There Are No Distractions,” but then I remembered that the summer break before senior year isn’t totally free: studying for ACT/SAT retakes, summer jobs, family vacations, etc. For some up-and-coming seniors, summer can feel just as busy as the school year.

Overall, you should have fewer distractions during the summer months. With less on your plate, you can dedicate not only time but also energy (and hopefully some passion, too) into writing the best first draft you can.

Just like with writing an academic essay, select a time and place that fits your writing style. If your room is too distracting, go to the library. If writing on the computer means that you’re tempted to go online or play games, use a paper and pencil for your first draft.

Review Your myKlovr Student Portfolio

The summer before your senior year is a great time to review your myKlovr student portfolio. Reading through your academic, extracurricular, and personal progress will help you brainstorm anecdotes that will eventually appear in your essay.

Begin the Editing Process

Let’s say you finish the first draft over the summer. First of all, that’s great! You’re already ahead of the game. Though I wouldn’t begrudge you if you decided to take the rest of the summer off, you may want to begin the editing process.

Here’s one thing you can try: email one or more of your teachers over the summer and see if they will critique your draft. As long as you’re polite, it never hurts to ask. Many teachers don’t check their email over the summer, which means you may not hear back. Please don’t feel offended if this happens to you.

Let’s say you get lucky and your teacher agrees. You’ve just won the lottery. Why? Just like you, your teachers aren’t as busy over summer break. They will be able to read your essay without a thousand other things vying for their attention. As a result, their feedback will likely be better than if you had asked for it after the school year begins.

Final Thoughts

Depending on the colleges where you will apply this fall, your essay ranks second or third in importance in your college application portfolio. Your words give college admissions counselors a personal view of you as an individual. By starting the writing process in the summer, you guarantee that your best self shines on the page.

Start Planning Summer College Tours Now

Are you a high school freshman, sophomore, or junior? If so, I bet you’re already looking forward to summer break. Do you have a summer job or internship lined up? Or maybe you’re going to be lounging by the pool or ocean. Either way, summer break is the perfect time for a few college tours with the family. And you know what, it never hurts to start planning for them in advance.

In this article, we’ll discuss how to plan your summer college tours depending on what grade you’re wrapping up this spring.

If You’re a Freshman

If you’re a freshman, you have a simple task: go on a single college tour.

Yep, that’s it. After all, as a freshman, college is still a long way off. At this point, it’s okay to have NO IDEA about where you want to go to college or what you want to study once you get there. So to simplify the process, choose a college within driving distance that you and your family can visit over summer break.

Researching which colleges to tour will also introduce you to many facets of the college experience. Here’s all the information you can learn from just a few minutes reading a college’s website:

  • Majors offered
  • Tuition
  • Housing

Learning about these (and more) topics for the first time will lead to more questions, but that’s okay. By familiarizing yourself now with the ins and outs of the college experience, you’ll be better prepared as the transition to college approaches.

On Your Tour

So it’s summer, and you and your family have arrived on campus. As an up-and-coming sophomore, all you should be doing is listening/taking mental notes. The other students on the tour will be older and might have very specific questions about the college. Pay attention to their questions and the answers they receive.

Since this is your first college tour, you may quickly realize that this particular college isn’t for you. That’s okay, too! The experience is still extremely valuable, however, as the tour will expose you to much about the college experience that is identical no matter where you eventually end up going.

If You’re a Sophomore

In the sophomore year, you take either the PLAN or PSAT to gauge your readiness for the ACT or SAT. The companies who make these tests sell your information to colleges across the nation. Depending on your scores, you may have received dozens of letters from colleges vying for your attention. With such a large stack of letters, it can be intimidating to sort through them all. Your job between now and summer break is to choose three colleges which you would like to tour.

Now that you’re halfway done with high school, you should have a firm grasp on which subjects you enjoy. While rifling through potential colleges, ask yourself some fundamental questions:

  • Which colleges have strong programs that align with my interests?
  • Do I want to be close to home or far away?
  • What can my family afford?

These questions should help you turn a long list of potential colleges into a manageable few. You are now ready to go on some tours.

On the Tours 

This summer, I want you asking questions (lots of them) on your college tours. If you’ve done your research, there is a good chance that one of the schools you visit this summer will be where you go to college. Here are some potential questions to get you started:

  • Can I sit in on a summer class?
  • What work opportunities exist on campus?
  • How does Greek life play a part in campus culture?

Also, while on the tour, imagine yourself spending four years on campus. In many ways, touring a college is like looking for a new home. Choosing a school that matches your personality will go a long way to encouraging your academic success.

If your family cannot afford to visit colleges that are far away, don’t worry. That’s why college websites exist. Also, if you have questions, call the admissions department. They will be happy to answer all of your questions.

If You’re a Junior

If you’re a junior, this is your last high school summer break. Before classes are back in session, you need to finalize your college list. Doing this may require an additional college visit or two. Why not more? Well, the summer break before senior year is one of your final chances to set yourself apart as a future applicant. Here are some examples:

  • Taking the ACT or SAT for the second time
  • Performing an internship (Or working at a job where you learn a vital skill)
  • Completing a volunteer project

There’s already a lot to do this summer, so I don’t want to overload you. One or two final college tours is more than enough.

On the Tours

As an up-and-coming senior, the purpose of your college tours should focus on answering vital questions you have about the school’s academic programs and how they can prepare you for your future. It’s alright if you don’t have a major picked out (remember that plenty of college students change their majors, too) but make sure the college has strong programs in two or more of your primary academic interests.

After a Tour

Before wrapping up, let’s discuss what to do at the end of a college tour. If you received permission to sit in on summer classes, that should be #1 on your list. After that, here are some ideas that will help you better get to know your potential home for the next four years:

  • Eat in the cafeteria with your family
  • Explore the library and lecture halls
  • Read the student newspaper
  • Take to some current students

In short, become an active observer.

Final Thoughts

Even with the internet and email, college tours are still an essential stepping stone between you and receiving a letter of acceptance from your dream school. Also, they are the rare occasion when colleges try to impress potential students (and not the other way around). So this summer, invest a little of your vacation time into planning for the future.

See you on campus!

Is There a Silver Bullet to College Admissions?

When the monster hunter needed to defeat the werewolf, he bought a box of silver bullets for his revolver. You see, silver bullets were the only thing that could kill the werewolf. All the silver bullets in the box looked the same, and the monster hunter was confident that shooting any one of them would save his town from the werewolf menace.

It’s easy to think that there are ‘silver bullets’ for other aspects of our life. “This pill is a silver bullet for weight loss!” “This DVD is a silver bullet for helping your toddler learn!” The list goes on and on. Unfortunately, all this silver bullet advertising can lead you to believe that there is a one-size-fits-all silver bullet that all students can use to get into their dream college.

Silver bullets in college admissions don’t exist…at least for most people. Families with millions of dollars can write a fat check to a college to accept their child. Other colleges clamor to attract children of celebrities and politicians. Colleges around the country seek out the next generation of sports stars. Those are guaranteed-to-work silver bullets.

But if you’re reading this article, I doubt you’re a sports star, or your family has a famous name/piles of spare cash ready to be used as a legal bribe.

So instead of prescribing silver bullets, let’s look at how you can dramatically increase your chances of acceptance to your dream college by reframing your application. And as a bonus, none of the points in this article have anything to do with your grades or extracurricular activities.

Diversity Matters

Since 1973, colleges and universities have been barred from setting racial quotas when they admit a new batch of students. Even without quotas, many universities actively recruit students who are part of minority groups. In recent years, this practice has extended to students of all races who are from more impoverished families. Of course, these students must meet the same academic qualifications as other students to gain acceptance.

So why do colleges and universities spend millions of dollars every year when they don’t have to. Simple: diversity improves a college’s brand. This was the case when I went to Vanderbilt University in the mid-2000s. Though a fantastic school, Vanderbilt was still trying to figure out how to shake off a legacy of segregation and continued racial tension. Besides a top-notch recruiting department, they sponsored summer programs for students from minority backgrounds.

Being part of a minority group or coming from a family without a lot of money can have many drawbacks, but when it comes time to apply to college, it’s an advantage. Again, it’s no silver bullet, especially in the last few years as more and more high school seniors apply to the best schools. However, if you come from one of these groups, make sure the college admissions counselor reading your application knows it.

Preserving Through Hardship

So let’s say you’re like me – white and from an upper-middle class family. What options do you have? Well, I hate to ask such a personal question, but did anything awful happen to you in the last four years? Preserving through extreme hardship (breakup of the family, serious illness, death of a parent/sibling, etc.) can work to your advantage in multiple ways.

The first way is obvious: sympathy points. College admission counselors are human, after all, and they will connect to the story of a teenager going through hard times. The second part of the puzzle is much more important. If you kept up your grades during this difficult time (it’s okay if there was a small downward blip), that fact alone shows you can preserve through anything school or life can throw at you. Universities and colleges WANT students like that. Those are the students that not only excel in the classroom but also become leaders and leave their mark on both the school but the wider world.

So if you have that story to tell, tell it in your personal essay.

Above All, What Makes You Unique?

Again, let’s say you’re like me – white, from an upper-middle-class family, and thankful that nothing horrible has happened to you or a family member in the last few years. Is there anything left that remotely comes close to resembling a silver bullet?

Fortunately, the answer is yes. Imagine your average college admission counselors. It’s February, meaning that she has a HUGE stack of applications to read. They’re all the same: good grades, good extracurriculars, etc. They start to blur together…until she sees something that makes her do a double take.

What can cause such a reaction?

Answer: Coming across an applicant who set herself apart from the pack

Who is this applicant?

Answer: Someone who relentlessly pursues a personal passion in their spare time

Think about it: there are things you love to do that have little to no relation to your academics or extracurriculars. Maybe you’re in a band, like to paint, or write short stories. For most people, these and other activities are just hobbies. Wouldn’t it be nice to take these passions to the next level? Even if you never book a show, sell a painting, or see your name in print, putting your creativity and passion out into the wider world shows a level of commitment, passion, and responsibility that most college applicants, even brilliant ones, sorely lack.

This kind of story, if told just the right way in your personal essay, will make any college admissions counselor do a double take.

Final Thoughts

Silver bullets in the college admissions world do exist, but most of us can’t get our hands on them. Instead of searching for silver bullets, emphasize what makes you unique when writing your personal essay. That way, college admissions counselors will get to know the real you, and just as important, what you can bring to their school.

 

Back to Top