Student’s Blog

Students of all Achievement Levels Cheating. But who’s to Blame?

Whether your parents like it or not, cheating has been a part of academia since the beginning. The nature of cheating, however, is rapidly changing. There have always been struggling students who cheat so survive.

However, more and more studies in the past few years have shown that higher achieving students are beginning to cheat to get ahead, and stay ahead. According to the NY Times, studies on student behavior have shown that the majority of students violate academic standards and integrity to some degree.

The reason is fairly simple. It’s easy. As Gen Z is growing up using conveniently enhanced technology at their fingertips throughout the school day (or at home), students are tempted to compromise their integrity and work ethic for a better grade or less time spent completing an assignment.

Not to mention, educators, parents, and leaders of society are failing to alleviate this world-wide academic phenomenon in a couple ways. Between new media outlets and downloadable pieces of software, the internet truly has changed perceptions on what exactly we consider “ownership.” No one is pointing fingers there… yet.

However, as a result, students are unclear about the guidelines of assignments, especially when a lack of differentiation is given on which resources are allowed and which are not. Take a look at the Harvard cheating scandal from 2012.

A professor issued a take-home final with directions on the first page reading as follows, “The exam is completely open book, open note, open internet, etc. However, in all other regards, this should fall under similar guidelines that apply to in-class exams. More specifically, students may not discuss the exam with others—this includes resident tutors, writing centers, etc.”

Why would a professor use “etc.” in his policies? What other “open” resources are allowed, then?? Regardless, the scandal lead to an investigation of half of the 279 students enrolled in the course, around 2 percent of the undergraduate body, leading to law suits from each side, as well as a number of various and severe disciplinary actions… an absolute catastrophe.

Who was guilty and who was not is not the point. It is the systematic approach from both sides of the cheating phenomenon that must be corrected. Howard Gardner, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education said that over the 20 years he has studied professional and academic integrity, “the ethical muscles have atrophied,” in part because of a culture that exalts success, however it is attained.”

Cheating may be easy. Cheating may be unclearly defined. However, do yourself a favor and think about what’s at stake next time you contemplate cheating. Most students feel the need to cheat from factors such as academic pressure, lack of organization and preparedness, or poor communication and understanding.

Let myKlovr 2.0 take care of these influences for you by using this application to help you earn your desired grades, college experience, job placement, and future.

3 Tips for Incoming College Students

You are what you like

Attention class of 2018. Whether you are dying to start fresh with the next stage of your life, or you simply want to preserve a reputation that you built over the past 4 years, you are going to be presented with a plethora of opportunities to re-market yourself to a new network of peers.

As you enter college, your digital voice is about to exponentially grow. Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, that new LinkedIn account that your parents told you to make, your school’s social education platform, you name it.

Regardless of the media outlet, be cautious of what content you are associating yourself with. Leave the childish or inappropriate retweets and likes in high school. Scratch that, don’t leave them there. Delete them.

You never know when they could be used against you. Conversely, liking, creating, or sharing inspirational and informative content that you want to be associated with is a great way of letting old friends know what you are up to, as well as marketing yourself to new ones.

 

Creativity is your new currency

As generation Z is growing up with far more technology and purchasing power than any other previous generation, more and more educational institutions are incorporating free-flowing and team-oriented creativity into their curriculums.

For example, take a glance at Bryant University, a small school in Smithfield, Rhode Island. Here at Bryant, each freshman, regardless of their intended major, endures a 3-day intensive program (16 hours each day) that attempts to maximize potential customers of a local business by improving their business plan and creating a prototype to be pitched to alumni.

Whether you like it or not, the design thinking process will most likely be part of your curriculum, and probably even more so, part of your career path. Use it to your advantage and start learning about the concept of innovation.

Many students compete against each other for the best grades and achievements while having many of the same skills. However, what students are failing to realize is that their ideas and creativity are the X factors to the tipping point of their success.

 

Be present

Thank you notes, networking emails, chatting with with professors after an interesting class… Anything you could think of to be present in the moment that you are in by communicating and learning from the people that you want to know a little bit better.

Although preparing for your future is imperative to educational and professional success, do not take your current opportunities for granted by failing to be attentive and present each day, each class, each moment.

The late Brian Fleury, former athletic director and mentor at Delbarton School, one of America’s most prestigious high schools in academics and in athletics once said, “Attitude. This is what I want to end with…please pay attention to how you approach each and every day of your life. Make the decision – and it is an individual, conscious decision – to be positive about the day ahead of you.

Like I talk to you about all the time, be present, be where you are, care about what you claim to care about, love the things you claim to love…”

5 Simple Tricks to Relieve Academic-Related Stress

“Worrying is often triggered by wanting to make the perfect choice or by trying to maximize everything. When buying a used car, you want one that is cheap, reliable, safe, sexy, the right color, and fuel efficient.

Unfortunately, no single option is likely to be the best in all those dimensions. If you try to have the best of everything, you’re likely to be paralyzed by indecision or dissatisfied with your choice.” (Alex Corb, author of the Upward Spiral).

Studies have shown that academic-related stress is sky rocketing among high school students each decade. As the academic level of competition rises between teenagers, along with it comes an increased national average of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, or even alcohol and substance abuse.

However, I’m here to tell you 5 simple tricks that will help you relieve stress, increase focus, and produce healthier and more effective results on a daily basis.

 

1) Write down things you look forward to and be mindful of them

According to studies in The Happiness Advantage, setting a date for a potentially enjoyable experience raises endorphin levels in your brain by 27%. No matter what you have going on in your day, keep a sticky note in your backpack of all the enjoyable events coming up in the next month.

That might be something as simple as grabbing a slice of pizza with a friend this weekend, seeing a movie with your family, going for a walk with your dog after school, or planning a social event with classmates, teammates, or co-workers next week. Creating positive anticipation in your life will increase neurotransmitters, raising endorphin levels and reducing stress and anxiety.

 

2) Exercise!

No one likes being told to exercise… (especially with an exclamation point at the end of it). But I promise you it helps not only from a physical standpoint, but from a mental standpoint as well.

A Harvard study has shown that regular exercise creates health benefits, such as protecting against heart disease and diabetes, improving sleep, and lowering blood pressure. “High-intensity exercise releases the body’s feel-good chemicals called endorphins, resulting in the “runner’s high” that joggers report,” ultimately reducing depression symptoms (Harvard Health Letter).

 

3) Organization and Routine

If your stressed out with academics, athletics, job hunting, or your internship, take a look at your daily routine and see if you could find the source.

Get up before school with twenty minutes to spare (reducing anxiety of being late or forgetful), take the time to eat a healthy breakfast to fuel your energy for the day, do your homework at the same time every day to get in a systematic routine, take another twenty minutes to review your notes after your school day to help you consistently reinforce the processing of class material, and even say hi or socialize with one person every day that you wouldn’t normally have a conversation with (I promise you it will get easier).

An organized routine of healthy habits is the easiest way to create that neurological upward spiral.

 

4) Find a mentor

This one is fairly simple. Find an upperclassman, teacher, relative, or teammate that you respect and can confide in, specifically someone who is older than you and has gone through your current stage of life.

This type of mentor can serve as a knowledgeable guide that can give you academic and career advice, or when you are just feeling stressed out after a tough day.

 

5) Sleep

No one can have a healthy and productive day without sleep. I don’t care who they are or how much money they’ve made. Sleep is the foundation from which your energy and motivation comes from.

If you get the 8 hours of sleep that your body needs each night, you will be more focused and attentive throughout your day. The last thing you need is to be caught snoozing in class when your crush finally complements your new hair-cut.

4 Ways for Students to Build their Personal Brand

1) Social Media

We live in a society where social media seems to dominate our reputations.  In fact, social media has gotten so personal in the past decade that concerns of privacy are becoming increasingly prevalent. For example, just look at Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook trial back in April regarding violations and infringements of data usage given to advertisers to target potential consumers. Horrifying.

Although social media is a scary concept with many negative components bringing stress to millions of Gen Z and Millennials, it can be used as an extremely effective marketing tool in order to build your personal brand… if you know how to harness it.

Whether you use Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Snapchat (the list goes on), or all of the mainstream mediums, you have the potential to gain a vast collective following, and therefore a digital voice that can be heard, regardless of your end goal.

That means putting your best foot forward. When it comes to social media, you want to have the right quantity of activity with content targeted towards the right market. Everyone is unique and different which means content should vary on a creative and individualized basis. This means updating your bio with interesting personal information.

If you’re a high school or college student, maybe put your school(s), grad year(s), and a quote that you live by as your bio. If you’re a start-up company, maybe put your brand’s slogan and your top services provided. Make sure you have your best profile picture available, perhaps a clear edited head shot incorporating the rule-of-thirds.

Be active on multiple forms of social media, especially LinkedIn in order to receive job updates, build connections, follow intriguing social media influencers and companies, read articles that interest you, and discover your passion(s).

Grow your follower base by keeping track of your personal analytical following through applications in the app store (unfollowing people you want to cut out of your life), using clever or comical captions and SEO trending hashtags, and staying engaged with comments, replies, likes etc.

Social media is an extremely informative marketing tool that anyone can use to market themselves to employers, friends, and potential connections.

 

2) On-Campus-Internships

If you’re a high school or college student who does not have time for a job or think it will take away from your academics during the school year, there are plenty of on-campus-internships at universities, as well as remote internships that will enhance your resume to future potential employers without consuming too much of your time.

Remote internships are a great way to get your foot in the door in the corporate world and can be tremendous learning experiences, especially if your field of interests are any of the following: communications, marketing, writing/journalism, psychology, social media, analytics, data research, and more.

These subjects are typically the most common among remote internships since more and more companies are finding it easier to get work done by students of these subjects even if they’re not physically in the office. In fact, many even offer college credits, giving you the option to save money that would be spent on taking another class.

 

3) Expanding Your Network

Being able to expand your network is one of the greatest “real-world” skills that a student or individual of any age can learn. This can be done via social media, including LinkedIn, representing the largest and most advanced form of your resume possible, connecting with companies that interest you, exploring myKlovr 2.0’s chat features after the launch, and reaching out to your connections.

For students looking to gain exposure to colleges, internships, jobs, or even just for fun, creating your own personal blog is another effective way to grow your network and personal brand, expand your following, and have your voice heard. You can write and publish articles on any topics you choose. Examples of popular blogging templates include WordPress, Wix, Squarespace, and many more.

When you submit a formal application to many colleges or employment opportunities, the recipient often times will ask for your “personal website” if you have one. Sharing your content on your personal blog is a great way to give insight of who you are and what you are passionate about. Use this opportunity to your advantage and start building that personal brand.

 

4) Daring to be Different

It is perfectly okay to step outside of your comfort zone. After all, this is what applications are all about. Learn what you are passionate about as soon as possible and attack that opportunity. For example, join that school club you always secretly wanted to get involved in, learn how to play that instrument you’ve been wanting to play, chase that crazy business idea, or even get involved in more athletics to learn how to work in a team environment.

Whether you’re a high school, college, or grad student, now is the time to learn about yourself and figure out your passion. Most people your age don’t know what that passion is yet, and that is okay. That is why you step out of your comfort zone to try new things. If you get involved by attempting to tackle new and productive challenges, your resume, applications, and personal brand will build themselves.

Your Ticket to Academic Success

It’s no secret ladies and gentleman. High school is one of the most imperative milestones in setting up a brighter and happier future. Everyone wants to perform at their best, keep parents off their back with a stellar GPA, and most importantly, land that dreamy college experience and education.

However, in today’s fast pace and chaotic education system, many skills to achieving success are often times overlooked. Everyone’s heard fellow classmates and friends blame their grades on study habits, poor time management skills, IQ, or even raw genetics. Us students seem to be losing sight of the level of control that we have over our future. And it’s easier than you would think.

The answer? Organization. Organization is a tool that everyone is born with, but not everyone unlocks. What separates the most successful students from the underachieving students has less to do with native intelligence indicated by IQ tests, background, or social class than one would guess. It is about the conscious choice of organization. Take a look at KIPP’s cultural organization, for example. KIPP is a free nationwide network of college-prep schools, originally started in New York City.

Examining the KIPP school in Brooklyn, “the children come from circumstances that lead regularly to academic failure and dropping out, but in this school they do very well indeed. By the end of 8th grade, 84 percent of the students perform at or above grade level, compared to a figure for the district schools in the area of 16 percent.” (Malcom Gladwell). It is cultural organization-based institutions like these that disrupt the education process in a positive manner.

How does KIPP help their students produce such successful results, you’re probably wondering. KIPP instills the practice of hard work and organization among their students at a very young age. KIPP educators inspire this regularly practiced skill set among their students by having them get up unusally early in order to make it to morning class on time, manage deadlines and assignments on a strict curriculum, set academic goals on a weekly and monthly basis, plan out ways to achieve them, and are checked in on periodically. 

It is prioritization tools like these that separate a student’s academic achievements in order to create an upward spiral for a healthier and happier life. In fact, don’t forget to check out the tool for helping you achieve those goals, upon myKlovr 2.0’s launching date.

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