act prep

What is All This Mail My High School Junior is Getting and How to Prioritize It

If you have seen a lot of mail from colleges coming for your high school junior, it’s most likely because they have just taken a PSAT or ACT. Colleges buy mailing lists from standardized tests. This is a way for lesser-known colleges to advertise to potential students. And a way for well-known schools to generate more applications which will then make their colleges more desirable and rank higher on lists like US News. This strategy began in the 1970s when the College Board agreed to sell names of students to colleges.

Sometimes the mail will seem personalized, noting the major your child is interested in. When the student takes the PSAT, they indicate their major of preference. This info is part of the info sold to colleges. Business schools can send mail to all potential business majors. Colleges also market to students based on their PSAT scores. So you may find that where University of Chicago is sending mail to a student who scored high on their PSAT’s their sibling who might have not scored so well is getting mail from lesser-known schools. 

Is it important for your student to open this mail? Only if something about the school is intriguing. This could be an opportunity for your student to learn about a school they never have heard of. Otherwise, you are free to recycle the paper mail and delete the emails. 

What if a specific school becomes aggressive in their mailings? The schools can be aggressive sending weekly emails with quizzes and activities to engage your child. They can ignore all of this. It will not make a difference if your student engages in these emails even if they plan to apply to that college.

Some college advisors suggest the student create a separate email address for all of their college related information. So before taking the PSAT help your student set up one of these emails. That way they can separate all the college-related email from their regular life email. If your student didn’t do this, then set up a folder with in their email box where they can store all the college-related emails. When they have downtime, they might spend a couple minutes looking at the emails, and then they can delete them. 

Organization is important during the college search. Your student will also gather college brochures from tours and college fairs. So perhaps setting up a storage box and some filing folders will be a great way to store important items without them getting lost. You can toss the snail mail in there too. 

The mail will slow down. It won’t be a solid two years of your mailbox being bogged down. But be on the lookout for those acceptance letters during the spring of their senior year. You don’t want to ignore those!

Is Tutoring the Answer to Help Boost My Kid’s SAT Score?

PSAT scores were released Monday, so now is an ideal time to create a test prep strategy with your tenth grader. The options: test prep classes, private tutor, test prep workbooks or as my twelfth-grade daughter, Sydney advised her tenth-grade brother, online test prep.

The in-class test prep classes are expensive and time consuming and they also require the student keep up with a daily practice. A tutor can be terribly expensive, and even with an hour tutoring session a week, the student is still encouraged to do test prep homework every day. Online test prep should be done everyday as well, but it is free.

Sydney’s point is that in all three cases, the student needs to self motivate in order to get through all the SAT/ACT concepts. So why spend the money when online test prep give you video explanations that can be re-watched if needed? Chances are that after a three-hour class on Saturday afternoon, you’ll need to review that info anyway.

With so many things going on during a school year, your student needs to pick their battles. If they score well on tests, that’s great. If they don’t, there are so many other important factors in a college application. If they are more confident in their writing abilities, they should focus on the essays and make those the pinnacle of their application. I suggest, save your money on test prep and put that money towards application fees later.

Sydney’s Test Prep Tips:

  • Time Management is essential. Start doing online test prep the week after Winter Break of Sophomore year. And keep it up over the summer.
  • Continue to review concepts. If you only do a concept once, it’s useless.
  • Become familiar with the test. Take a Sample Test once a month.
  • Be super comfortable with all the directions so you aren’t surprised on the day of the test. For example, there are a few questions at the end of the math section where you fill in your own answers. Make sure you understand how to fill in those answers correctly.
  • Familiarize yourself with how to fill in the bubbles in the demographic section. This is the first thing you’ll do and it can be super stressful if you are not prepared.
  • Don’t take the test more than three times. But do take it two times so you can use your Superscore. (From prepscholar.com: Superscoring is the process by which colleges consider your highest section scores across all the dates you took the SAT. Rather than confining your scores to one particular date, these schools will take your highest section scores, forming the highest possible composite score.)
  • And most important: don’t stress about it too much! Know that there are a lot of test optional schools out there and the list is growing.
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