applying to college

Top 15 Colleges in California

There is an overwhelming number of options for high school students to choose from when applying to college. In California alone, there are 264 4-year colleges.

For this reason, myKlovr has generated a list of the top 15 colleges in California. Take a look to learn more about these featured colleges.

 

1. Stanford University

Overview of Stanford University campus.

Location: Bay Area, CA

Total Enrollment: 16,914

Acceptance Rate: 5%

Fun Facts

Standford University was founded on November 11, 1885.

Stanford University has six schools, Business, Earth Energy and Environmental Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, and Medicine.

 

2. California Institute of Technology

Robert A. Millikan Memorial Library at Caltech.

Location: Pasadena, CA

Total Enrollment: 2,240

Acceptance Rate: 8%

Fun Facts

California Institute of Technology was founded in 1891.

The mascot of Caltech is a beaver, to honor natures engineers.

 

3. Pomona College

Mason Hall, an academic building at Pomona College.

Location: Claremont, CA

Total Enrollment: 1,703

Acceptance Rate: 10%

Fun Facts

Pomona College was founded in 1887.

An alumnus of Pomona college is Art Clokey, the creator of Gumby.

 

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top fifteen list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Claremont McKenna CollegeLiberal Arts1,347Claremont, CA9%Suburban
5Harvey Mudd CollegeLiberal Arts829Claremont, CA13%Suburban
6University of California, BerkeleyUniversity40,174Berkeley, CA16%Urban
7University of California, Los AngelesUniversity44,497Los Angeles, CA18%Urban
8University of Southern CaliforniaUniversity43,871Los Angeles, CA17%Urban
9Scripps CollegeLiberal Arts1,057Claremont, CA30%Suburban
10Pitzer CollegeLiberal Arts1,089Claremont, CA14%Suburban
11University of California, DavisUniversity36,441David, CA42%Urban
12University of California, San DiegoUniversity34,979La Jolla, CA36%Urban
13University of California, Santa BarbaraUniversity24,346Santa Barbara, CA36%Suburban
14Santa Clara UniversityUniversity8,422Santa Clara, CA48%Urban
15Occidental CollegeLiberal Arts2,062Los Angeles, CA46%Urban

 

MyKlovr created this top fifteen list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

Applying to an Arts College? Start Prepping Your Portfolio and Resume Now


On top of SAT’s, Common App essays, FAFSA reports — get ready for portfolio submissions and auditions if you plan on applying to an arts college or university program.

For performance based colleges you’ll send in a resume and audition recording with your application.  Your recording and resume are scrutinized and then you are either accepted, rejected or invited to attend an in-person audition. The performing arts colleges and universities all work together at this point and, starting early February, will set up auditions in several major cities in the US for scheduled auditions. Just this week, a friend from London is flying to Chicago where she will audition in-person for five of the top musical theater schools. She could have auditioned in Los Angeles or NYC, but Chicago worked out better for her schedule. So on top of the application fee, she needs to factor in costs for travel, hotels and taking time off school.

So how do you prepare for something like this? My tenth grade son is interested in applying to acting programs so he’s paying attention. He already understands that he’ll need to take Drama all four years of high school, perform in the fall play and spring musical each year and start applying for summer acting programs. So we have been researching those. Most of the summer programs require that you send in a monologue audition. Even if he doesn’t wind up going to one of these summer programs, practicing and recording the monologue seems important so that by the time he applies to college, he will have had experience .

My daughter’s friends who are applying to visual arts programs don’t have it any easier. Since ninth grade they have applied to summer arts programs and visual arts competitions. There are so many competitions out there, these kids seem to be collecting awards like crazy. I’ve also seen them apply for arts based internships which are highly selective and competitive. They work hard on their portfolios, often doing special projects outside of school. Some have even hired portfolio consultants to guide them through the portfolio process. The arts schools are just as competitive as the Ivy Leagues and sometimes professional consultants are useful.

One organization has come to my attention recently, YoungArts, which has a highly selective audition process finding the most talented high school students ages 15-18 in visual and performing arts. Starting in ninth grade your student can apply and if selected has a chance to work with remarkable mentors like, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Plácido Domingo. YoungArts offers college scholarship money as well as awarding Presidential Scholars each year. I was fortunate to meet one of these scholars who, at 18, sang, At Last, at the Kennedy Center in front of President Obama.

If your student is interested in this path, even slightly interested, take it seriously and prepare for the work. My son is already rehearsing his monologue for several summer programs. And the deadlines for those programs are at the end of this month.

A Guide to Early Decision

It’s mid-December, which means that while some students are finishing up their college applications for regular decision, others have already received their early decision results. For the fortunate, the news is the best holiday gift ever. For the less than fortunate, it’s a big lump of coal.

If you rolled the dice on early decision, the results will leave you with many questions. Or you may be a high school junior wondering if you should apply early decision next year. In this article, we’ll examine the early decision basics before diving into what you should do if you were accepted, rejected, or deferred.

Early Decision: The Basics

What’s the deal with early decision? It’s no big mystery. Colleges, especially ultra-selective ones, want to cultivate a stellar crop of freshman students. Early decision is a tool for them to get a head start on filling seats for the next year. After selecting part of the student body in November/December, they can fine-tune the remainder of the freshman class between January and March.

For a college-bound student like you, early decision has two benefits. First and foremost, applying early decision signifies to a college that it’s your first choice. If given a chance, you’d forego all other offers to attend that school. The second benefit comes if the school to which you apply early decision accepts you. With an acceptance in hand, you don’t have to worry about other college applications and the subsequent camping by the mailbox in April.

Finally, there is the issue of colleges having higher acceptance rates during early decision vs. regular decision. You may think that getting into your dream college is easier if you apply early decision. Not so. In fact, getting into your dream college may be more difficult applying early decision rather than regular decision.

I Was Accepted! Now What?

Congratulations for getting into your dream college! After coming down from Cloud Nine (and by all means, take as long as you want up there), it’s time to let the school know you’re on your way. Your acceptance packet should include information on how to do this.

So I can relax now, right?

Sort of. Yes, you don’t have to put one more ounce of effort into applying to college. That should come as a big relief! However, you still need to keep your grades up; they may play a role in pending scholarship decisions.

One more thing: don’t get into any trouble (legal or otherwise) between now and graduation. Your college has many people with whom it can replace you. That may sound a bit harsh, but it happens more often than you’d think.

So keep out of trouble and maintain those grades!

What if I change my mind?

Hopefully, by applying early decision, you made a sound choice as to where you want to attend college. For some students, though, after the joy of acceptance wears off, the doubts come flooding in. This isn’t uncommon. Many students have cold feet about committing to a particular school. Also, maybe in the time since applying, you realized that another college better matches your interests and career plans. Finally, your acceptance may come with little to no financial aid, putting your dream school out of reach.

First off, applying early decision isn’t a legally binding contract. You can turn down an acceptance and not suffer any negative life-changing consequences. However, before making any big decisions, please ask the advice of an adult you trust.

I Was Rejected! Now What?

I know from personal experience that being rejected early decision can be THE WORST! Not only is it a bummer, but rejection can also put a cloud over you as you try to juggle midterms, your regular decision applications, and the holiday season. To get you out of this funk, it’s important to keep two things in mind:

  • Other Colleges Won’t Know or Care. It’s easy to think that because you didn’t get into College A, Colleges B-E will reject you, too. That’s a fallacy. Different colleges have different admissions counselors, different expectations, and different cultures. Your perfect fit is still out there somewhere.
  • Focus on Your Regular Decision Applications. I don’t recommend mulling over why a college rejected you (you’ll never know), but it pays to consider if something was lacking in your early decision application. For example, did you edit your essays or have someone else read them? If you think your application was lacking, make sure to correct any mistakes before sending in your regular decision applications.

In other words, focus on what’s in front of you rather than on what’s behind you.

I Was Deferred! Now What?

For less than 5% of applicants, the answer isn’t a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ A deferral means that your dream college has postponed its decision, and will look at your application again from January to March. Depending on the school, you may need to submit additional materials such as an updated transcript. In possession of a complete student profile, admission counselors can make a more informed decision than before.

If this happens to you, don’t fret. You get another chance, a rarity in the college application game. Just like if you were rejected, polish those regular decision applications and settle in for a long wait.

Final Thoughts

As American lyricist Marshall Bruce Mathers III once said, “Look, if you had, one shot, or one opportunity to seize everything you ever wanted…would you capture it, or just let it slip?” I don’t think Mr. Mathers was singing about early decision, but it applies to your situation, nonetheless. Out of all your potential colleges, you can apply early decision to only one. Take time to consider which school (if any) has earned your early decision application.

And good luck. 🙂

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