#campuslife

A slightly overweight student in workout clothes walks down a path

How To Avoid The Freshman 15

If you are a high school student in the college application process, the chances are good that you have heard of the term ‘Freshman 15’ before. It refers to the weight that first-year students tend to put on during their first year at school. This tends to be a result of no longer having parents to watch over what you are eating, among other things. If you are not careful, that extra weight could take years to come off, if it ever does. So, here are some simple yet effective tips to avoid putting on the dreaded Freshman 15.

Schedule Your Workouts

Every college has a free gym for the student body to utilize. You may say you are going to go four times a week, and you may even do that for a few weeks, but unless you block out the time in your schedule for it, your new habit won’t last. When planning out your week, find three one-hour blocks that you can dedicate to going to the gym.

If you currently go to the gym, then this won’t be new to you. However, if this will be the first gym you do to, it’s important to pace yourself. The last thing you want to do is pull a muscle or get hurt during the first week of school. Download a workout app, and be sure to pace yourself. Also, try and find someone in your dorm building to be your workout buddy. This will keep you motivated to go when you’d rather just go back and nap.

Eat Healthy In The Dining Hall

Unhealthy meals are unavoidable when going away to college. There will be plenty of nights where you will have pizza for dinner or even breakfast. It’s okay to be social and go out to eat. However, this must be balanced with healthy meals in the dining hall. When eating on campus, try to eat as healthy and clean as possible.

For breakfast, be sure to load up on eggs and skip the pancakes and waffles. For lunch, try going back and forth between salads and sandwiches. Leave out the fried foods. For dinner, keep track of what you eat each day. Try not to have burgers, pizza, or fries two nights in a row. When possible, eat your vegetables and double down on healthy protein like chicken or steak.

Shop Like Your Parents

One of the biggest reasons new college students put on weight is because they have spent their whole lives eating whatever their parents put in front of them. Most parents avoid stocking up on unhealthy snacks or serving too many unhealthy meals. You may not have realized it, but I am sure there were several times that your parents refused to get take out because they thought you needed a home-cooked meal.

When at the grocery store, ask yourself if your parents would buy that? You can still buy your favorite snack, but limit it to one. More importantly, be sure to purchase the same type of healthy foods your parents used to buy. When in the dining hall, try to recreate the healthy meal your Mom used to serve you. If you can get into the mindset of your parents, you will be able to eat healthier.

Get An Accountability Partner

High achievers in the corporate world often speak about their accountability partners and how they have helped them grow and succeed. Trying to keep weight off at college is a difficult feat and requires support. Luckily for you, you do not have to look too far to find someone who is probably going through the same thing.

Once you agree to be accountability partners, you need to set your own fitness goals and share it with the other person. Then, you need to set a weekly meeting to review the previous week. This includes what you ate, how often you went to the gym, when you made good choices and when you made poor ones. Lastly, you need to agree that you can text each other when you need the motivation to go to the gym or eat healthy at dinner.

Conclusion

Going away to college is one of the most exciting times in your life. You deserve to have fun and not worry about putting on too much weight. While some weight gain might be inevitable, you can limit it by following the advice listed above. By following these tips, you can enjoy college and stay healthy at the same time.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is an educational coach helping students prepare for the next steps in life.

A young man and his parents unload bedding and books from the car, dropping off at college

5 Ways To Prepare For Going Away To College

Going away to college is one of the most exciting times in a young student’s life. You are taking the next step in your life by living on your own. You will get to meet new people and experience new things in a brand new town or even state. Living in a dorm is a great way to practice independence and prepare yourself for the real world that awaits you. If done correctly, it can be an overwhelmingly positive choice that turns you into someone that brings value and impact to the world around you.

It is also a significant change that should not be taken lightly. Over the years, I have heard from hundreds of graduates who spoke about being unprepared for living in a dorm and away from home. They entered college thinking about stuff like partying and how great it will be to be out on there own. Most of these graduates never stopped to think about the skills they would need or the lifestyle changes that were coming their way. This is why, this week, we are going to focus solely on how to prepare for this significant transition and change.

#1 – Start Waking Yourself Up In High School

Surprisingly, one of the most common issues that graduates tell me about there freshman year was oversleeping for class. Many of them spoke about how their parents would wake them up throughout high school. If they went back to sleep, their parents would come back in and wake them up again. Letting your parents wake you up and push you through your morning routine may seem harmless, but it is actually creating a bad habit with severe consequences. If you oversleep too many times, it will impact your grades and drag your GPA down before your event start.

If this sounds like you, it is time to make a change. Start small by setting the alarm on your phone and placing it on the other side of the room. The key will be telling your parents to no come and wake you up. If they think you overslept, they are not allowed to come and help you. Even if this means missing the bus and being late to class, it is better to try and fail now when the stakes are lower. After two weeks of getting yourself out of bed and into the shower, you will begin to develop a new routine that you can carry into college.

#2 – Learn How To Cook and Do Laundry

If you choose to go away to school, you are agreeing to begin your transition into becoming an adult. Being an adult means learning how to complete basic tasks by yourself. You especially need to grasp an understanding of skills like cooking and laundry because you will be required to do them at college. Not having clean clothes or food to eat can add unnecessary levels of stress. This may seem minor, but if you are struggling in a class at the same time, it can become overwhelming.

Not to worry, you still have time to prevent this from happening to you. Once again, it would be best if you started small. Ask your Mom to show you how to do the laundry. More importantly, even if you already know how too, start doing your laundry every week. It is not enough to learn something once. The only way to truly understand how to do something well is by doing it over and over again. Also, you want to start getting used to having more things to do throughout the day. This will help you budget your time better and ensure that you do not forget actually to clean your clothes.

In terms of learning to cook, this can be a vague task since there are so many different skill levels when it comes to preparing food. Learn the basics, including how to scramble eggs, make grilled cheese, soup, and grill chicken. You do not need to know how to cook gourmet meals every night for your entire floor. You need to know how to cook the occasional basic meal for the days you cannot make it to the dining hall. 

#3 – Learn Where Your Classes Are

As we mentioned before, going away to college is a massive transition. Even the most well-prepared freshman can become overwhelmed with all the new changes. Once you are signed up for your classes, it is crucial you know where they are in relation to your dorm room. Some will be within walking distance while others may require a bus. The last thing you want is to be late for your first class because you do not know where you are going.

Also, the amount of time it takes to get from class to class needs to be worked in your routine. You may not have your first class until 10 am, but if you are required to take a bus that leaves at 9:30, then you need to work backward to determine what time to get up. Again, it is all about not getting overwhelmed. By planning out your days and understanding where you need to be, you are reducing unnecessary stress and increase your chances of a smooth transition into college.

#4 – Connect With Other Incoming Freshman

Most incoming Freshmen have spent the last 12 years surrounded by family and friends. When you arrive at college, you are no longer surrounded by either. Adjusting to not seeing your family every day can be difficult and is pretty much unavoidable. However, not having friends to lean on during this transitional period can prove to be too much to bear. Most students who transfer back home do so because they are homesick. Again, it is not about being overwhelmed by one change but by the combination of several changes.

Make it a point to connect with other incoming first-year students through Facebook and Instagram. Do your research and see if someone has created a Facebook group for your incoming class. Then find some people who live close to you and send them a personal message. It may seem awkward at first, but chances are they are looking for the same type of connection. If possible, try to meet a few of your future classmates in person. At the very least, you will have a few familiar faces when you arrive on campus.

#5 – Create A Study Schedule

It is almost impossible to prepare for what it is like to live in a college dorm. There are dozens of students living on the same floor as you. They have different majors and schedules and, therefore, will be free and active at different times of the day. Take it from experience; there will always be someone doing something more fun than going to class or studying. This is a very easy trap for anyone to fall into. The key is to create a plan to prevent it from happening.

A hard rule I implore all of my student coaching clients to follow when they get to college is to not study in your dorm room. It may seem like the more comfortable option at first, but it comes with several distractions. First, you will have roommates who may be watching TV or playing video games and will want you to do the same. Second, there will be other students in the hallways, knocking on your door and doing fun things you would rather be doing. You may be tempted to cut your studying short to join in on the fun.

My strong advice here is to create a studying schedule for yourself. Take your class schedule and find blocks of time where you can go to the library and study instead of going back to your dorm room. For example, if you have a 3-hour block in between classes, make it a point to get something to eat and then go to the library. Look at what work you have due that week and next week and get started on it. This will allow you to focus and ensure you are dedicating enough time to your studies.

Conclusion

Living at college can be a fantastic journey. It can provide new connections and experiences that help you grow as a student and a person. Most college students stay in contact with the people they met at school for decades after graduation. Going away to school is not something to be feared. However, it is something to take seriously. Significant changes are coming in your life, and you need to be prepared. You owe it to your future self to be as prepared as possible to have the best college experience you can.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is an educational coach helping students prepare for the next steps in life.

Female college student, successful at something, pumping her fist and smiling

Investing In Personal Development

As a high school student, your days are packed with learning. You attend 7-8 classes per day, and they all assign varying degrees of work, including essays, projects, and tests to study for. As a student, you have been conditioned to work on whatever is assigned to you. It’s easy to adopt a mindset that if it isn’t required, I am not going to do it. This is a dangerous type of attitude to choose because of the severe impact it can have on your future.

As a high school student preparing for college, you are about to embark on one of the most transformative phases of your life. Here is where your choices will lay the groundwork for your career and your future. Yes, you should be focused on getting good grades and applying to colleges. However, you should also focus on growing yourself outside of the classroom. The most successful people in the world attribute that success in investing time in their personal development.

Personal development is a fancy term that many people use to sell books, courses, and other services. In simple terms, it is the act of gaining knowledge and skills that will help you grow and mature. Think of it as a workout for your brain. You go to the gym and use specific machines to increase the strength in your arms, legs, chest, and back. Personal development materials help you improve your mental strength in areas of communication, work ethic, organization, time management, and other areas of your life that help you succeed.

Most adults spend time in this area by watching videos, reading books, or listening to podcasts. However, those same adults would tell you that they regret not investing in themselves sooner. If they had taken the time to learn the skills listed above, they would have done better in college, gotten a job faster, and most likely be making more money. Personal development is critical at a young age because it gives you an edge over your competition.

So, how does one get started in improving themselves in this way? First, you must set aside time for it. Chances are, your schedule is packed, and whatever free time you do have is spent playing video games or watching TV. To start, schedule 30 minutes of personal development time, three days a week. Choose days and times that you will always be free to ensure you stick to your schedule. Then, designate an accountability partner to check-in and ask about what you are studying and what you have learned.

Once you have the time set aside, then you can focus on what to learn. Take out a pen and paper and write down your three most significant weaknesses. For me, as a student, this was organization, time management, and staying motivated. Then, write down three things you want to learn. This is where you can write down specific skills you want to learn before college, such as becoming a better writer, being stronger in math, or even adult responsibilities you haven’t learned yet.

Now that you have your list, you must prioritize them. You will not always have time to cover all your desired topics every week. Therefore, you need to decide what is most important. For example, if you struggle to manage your time, and you want to go away to college, this is a skill you need to start learning. If you are interested in a major that requires a lot of math or writing, that is what goes to the top of your list. Personal development is about learning specific skills that will help you achieve your short and long term goals.

The most overwhelming part of committing to developing your soft skills is the massive amounts of material out there for you to choose from. They come in all forms, such as books, podcasts, and courses. Only you understand how you learn best. Also, think about what is going to be most enjoyable for you. If you don’t love to read, don’t buy a book. If you are a visual learner, then commit to watching videos. The key is to know what you are trying to learn and putting in a process that will help you retain the information and refer back to it in the future.

It’s been proven that younger adults enjoy consuming videos over print content. You might be amazed to discover how much free content is on YouTube for you to take advantage of. A simple search of your desired topic will return thousands of results and several videos created by experts and reputable sources. If you are looking for more organized content that will guide you through a series of courses, I suggest checking out LinkedIn Learning. This paid platform provides multi-videos courses for skills such as time management, communication skills, and much more.

In addition, there are countless books and podcasts that will teach you almost anything you want to learn. When deciding which to choose, read the reviews to get an idea of what other people think about the content. Again, do not worry about picking the right book or podcast. Focus on where in your life, you are looking to grow, and what specific skills you need to learn in order to get there.

Personal development is something everyone should do, but most people don’t until it’s too late. As you begin your journey into the real world, you owe it to your future self to invest in giving yourself the best possible chance to succeed. Your weaknesses and shortcomings will not go away if you ignore them. They grow larger and threaten to damage your future and overall quality of life. Now is the time to commit to bettering yourself and creating a long-term plan centered around personal development.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is an educational coach helping students prepare for the next steps in life.

Really, really messy dorm room - clothes, food, everything everywhere

4 Ways College Is Different From High School

Out of all the students and graduates, I have coached throughout the years, the one thing they all seem to have in common in that they weren’t adequately prepared for the next phase of their life. All of them are referring to the real world and life in corporate America. However, most of them often speak about how difficult it was to adjust to college life after spending the last four years in high school. To avoid the missteps of the grads before you and to ensure your transition is an easier one, We have compiled the four ways college is different from high school and what you can do to prepare accordingly.

#1 – Class Size

This one catches people off guard because most students know that their college classes will be larger than those they attended in high school. You have already seen the lecture halls on the campus tours and are aware that you will be taking some of your classes with 50 or even 100 other students. What surprises first-year students is how different the actual learning experience is. You are no longer guaranteed to get your question answered if you raise your hand. The chances are high that you won’t have a personal relationship with your teacher either. You will be expected to learn quickly, take good notes, and figure things out on your own.

If this does not sound like your ideal learning situation, you should keep this in mind when applying to colleges. While large lecture halls may be unavoidable for some of your core classes, make sure that your major classes are smaller. When you take a course in this type of setting, take detailed notes, and pay attention. Also, be aware of your teacher’s office hours. This is your opportunity to meet with them in a personal setting to review anything you don’t understand. Remember, you have to make an appointment to do this, so do not wait until the last minute before a big test.

#2 – Attendance

If I were to ask you what is the number one reason you don’t skip class, it would be because you don’t want to get in trouble. In high school, and the years leading up to it, if you missed a class, you got detention, and your parents were notified. You have been unknowingly conditioned to attend class out of fear of the consequences. When you go to college, there are no more consequences. If you miss a class, your teacher marks it down and moves on. No one else finds out about it. This is where most freshmen get in trouble.

The critical thing to remember here is that while your teacher doesn’t notify your parents, they may deduct it from your grade. At the start of the semester, be sure to scan the class syllabus for the professors’ attendance policy. When you are aware of how missing a class will lower your grade, your motivation to attend suddenly returns. However, you really shouldn’t need consequences to attend the courses you are paying for. Remember why you applied to college in the first place and the goals you have set out for yourself.

#3 – Class Length

Some of the high school students I work with get very excited about the idea of only having to take certain classes two or three times a week. What they don’t realize is that those classes can be between 60 and 90 minutes. This can be a difficult adjustment for someone who is used to all there classes being under 45 minutes. It is even more difficult for someone who struggles to pay attention and takes poor notes. Longer classes mean more information is being covered. If you decide to zone out or skip the class altogether, you will be missing a significant amount of learning and knowledge.

The easiest way to stay focused during longer classes is to take consistent notes. If you have something to do, you are less likely to zone out and miss something. You can take this a step further by creating an organized process for your note-taking. Determine how to structure your notes in a way that will allow you to refer back to them in the future quickly. Also, be sure to get enough sleep the night before. The better rested you are, the more energy you will have to pay attention in class.

#4 – Living Environment

This one pertains specifically to those students who will be going away to college. It is natural and expected to be excited about dorming at college and living on your own. You can finally enjoy the freedom you have been longing for. However, that newfound freedom is one of the top reasons, so many freshmen end up coming back home after their first year away. Living at college is a complete lifestyle change and can be a culture shock for anyone who does prepare for it.

First off, you no longer have your parents around to bug you to do things. You are entirely on your own to wake yourself up, make sure you eat, clean your clothes, go to class, and study for tests. If you do not already know how to do any of the things on that list, you are going to have a problem. Second, when living in a dorm, there will always be someone around who is doing something more fun than studying or homework. It will be incredibly easy to seek these people out and blow off your schoolwork. This type of mindset is what sends more than half freshman home to attend a local college there the second year.

The first step to avoiding this type of disaster is making a list of everything your parents currently do for you. By the time you go off on your own, you should be able to do everything on that list. Second, commit to completing all of your schoolwork in the library. It is ideal to complete your work before you even return to the dorms. This way, you can relax with your friends and not worry about being distracted and missing any crucial assignments.

Conclusion

As an incoming freshman, you have every right to be excited about college and what lies ahead for you. The key is to take it seriously and prepare yourself accordingly. Take the time before you graduate to understand what skills you need to learn and what type of environment you need to succeed. Determine why you are going to college and what kind of person you want to become. Once you figure that out, you will have the focus and motivation you need to transition into and succeed in college.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is an educational coach helping students prepare for the next steps in life.

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