college

Top 10 Colleges in New York

By Emma Lorenzo

Interested in the top colleges in the state of New York? There are over 60 four year colleges to choose from in the state of New York.

MyKlovr has generated a list of the top 10 colleges in the state of New York.

 

1. Columbia University

Butler Library at Columbia University.

Location: New York, NY

Total Enrollment: 25,084

Acceptance Rate: 7%

Fun Facts

Columbia University was established in 1754.

The MGM Studio‘s Lion was inspired by Columbia’s Lion mascot.

 

2. Cornell University

Cornell University campus.

Location: Ithaca, NY

Total Enrollment: 22,319

Acceptance Rate: 15%

Fun Facts

Cornell University was founded on April 27, 1865.

The chicken nugget was created at Cornell University by Robert C. Baker in the 1950s.

 

3. Colgate University

Colgate University hill panorama.

Location: Hamilton, NY

Total Enrollment: 2,890

Acceptance Rate: 27%

Fun Facts

Colgate University was founded in 1819.

The top three career fields of 2017 Colgate University graduates are Business/management, Communications/media, and Consulting.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Barnard CollegeLiberal Arts2,588New York, NY17%Urban
5New York University University250,550New York, NY32%Urban
6Hamilton CollegeLiberal Arts1,879Clinton, NY26%Rural
7University of RochesterUniversity11,209Rochester, NY38%Suburban
8Vassar CollegeLiberal Arts2,424Poughkeepsie, NY27%Suburban
9Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and ArtLiberal Arts964New York, NY13%Urban
10Rensselaer Polytechnic InstituteUniversity7,442Troy, NY44%Suburban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

Top 10 Colleges in the Midwest

By Emma Lorenzo

Choosing a college can be very stressful for high school students. Being in high school is hard enough with a full class schedule, extracurriculars, friends, and family.

Luckily, myKlovr has generated a list of the top ten colleges in the Midwest to help narrow down the options.

1. University of Chicago

Harper Library at the University of Chicago.

Location: Chicago, IL

Total Enrollment: 13,322

Acceptance Rate: 8%

Fun Facts

The University of Chicago was founded in 1890.

Popular majors at the University of Chicago include Economics, Political Science and Government, Biology, Mathematics, and Public Policy Analysis.

2. University of Notre Dame

The main building at the University of Notre Dame.

Location: Notre Dame, IN

Total Enrollment: 12,393

Acceptance Rate: 19%

Fun Facts

The University of Notre Dame was founded on November 26, 1842.

The school colors of the University of Notre Dame are blue and gold, the mascot is an Irish Terrier dog.

3. Washington University in St. Louis

Location: St. Louis, MO

Seigle Hall at Washington University in St. Louis.

Total Enrollment: 15,032

Acceptance Rate: 17%

Fun Facts

Washington University in St. Louis was founded on February 22, 1853.

Washington University in St. Louis has students and faculty from all 50 U.S. states and more than 120 countries.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4University of Michigan- Ann ArborUniversity44,718Ann Arbot, MI29%Urban
5Carleton College Liberal Arts2,105Northfield, MN16%Rural
6The University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUniversity46,951Champaign, IL60%Urban
7Grinnell CollegeLiberal Arts1,699Grinnel, IA20%Rural
8University of Wisconsin- MadisonUniversity43,336Madison, WI53%Urban
9Oberlin CollegeLiberal Arts2,912Oberlin, OH28%Suburban
10Case Western Reserve UniversityUniversity11,664Cleveland, OH35%Urban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

Remedies for Homesickness

By Kendell Shaffer

It’s almost Columbus Day and I am learning some of my daughter’s friends who went to college across the country are flying home for the long weekend. I know they are also planning to come home for Thanksgiving, so why spend the money and take the long journey now? Homesickness is why.

My daughter who just moved into her dorm last week wants to come home next weekend to see her friends. She is already feeling homesick but I don’t think coming home next weekend would be a good idea.

I feel lucky to talk to my daughter almost every day since she has been gone and my son texts her most nights. I know she talks to her high school friends quite often. Her campus is amazing and there is so much to do and so many new friends to make. So why be homesick? I told her she is not missing anything here. “If you were home now you’d probably just be hanging out on the sofa reading.” “That’s what I want to do!” she said.

According to CNN, “… despite the way it’s coined, homesickness isn’t necessarily about home. And neither is it exactly an illness, experts said.
‘Instead, it stems from our instinctive need for love, protection and security — feelings and qualities usually associated with home’, said Josh Klapow, a clinical psychologist and associate professor at the University of Alabama’s School of Public Health. ‘When these qualities aren’t present in a new environment, we begin to long for them — and hence home. You’re not literally just missing your house. You’re missing what’s normal, what is routine, the larger sense of social space, because those are the things that help us survive,’ Klapow said.”

“He offered another way of approaching homesickness: It’s merely an emotion that comes in waves. ‘Very few emotions stay with you all the time, they come and they go,’ he said. But when it strikes, both children and adults often get caught off guard by it, he added. ‘They think something’s terribly wrong. But it’s normal and adaptive to feel homesick for some period of time. It’s just your emotions and mind telling you you’re out of your element.’”

“‘It turns out, [homesickness is] the very thing that inoculates against a future bout of homesickness,’ Thurber said. ‘By living through a difficult separation, your mind forces itself to cope.’ It’s this reason why experts advise parents against helicoptering their children out of college if they complain about homesickness.”

Kaplow suggests parents stop emailing and texting their students every five minutes. Instead set up a time once a week when they talk. Students need to learn problem solving and suffering a bit can be the best way to learn.

How can you not love it when your college freshman calls you and wants to tell you about her day? It feels wrong to tell my daughter I can’t talk to her for another week. But I see his point, I get it.

The last thing you want to do is to watch your child suffer. And if homesickness is not missing your home but it stems from the instinctive need for love, then us parents are suffering from homesickness too with our kids gone. So maybe the once a week call is good for all of us. As hard as it is to admit.

Works Well with Others: Why Group Projects Matter

By Thomas Broderick

It happens every time: your teacher assigns a group project and puts you with someone who contributes little to nothing. “Oh yeah, just put my name on it.” Lazybones gets full credit for doing zilch. The experience makes you think that group projects should have no part of the modern high school experience.

Yes, group projects as we know them need some tweaks. (There are lots of things teachers can do to ensure that everyone participates, but that’s an article just for them.) At their core, though, group projects matter and can play a valuable role in the learning experience.

If you’ve had a few lousy group projects, don’t stop reading just yet. Let me show you how group project success can have some happy side effects for your present and future selves. 

Group Projects Prepare You for Real Life

No matter what you do for a living, your professional success rides on working well with other people. Even I, working from home, always interact with my clients through email and phone calls. Just like at an office, everyone’s success depends on, you guessed it, everyone being on the same page and working together.

Your career might be 8+ years down the road, so here are a few ways that participating in group projects can help you TODAY:

  • “Works well with others” is an excellent line that college admission counselors want to see in a recommendation letter. That’s why I put it in the title!
  • Group work plays a significant role in extracurricular activities and volunteering.
  • Working in groups exposes you to different viewpoints and personality types.

To expand a bit more on that last point, different personality types means that you’ll regularly come across people whose personality types don’t match yours. Though this difference can cause conflict, it’s also a valuable opportunity to build your interpersonal skills.

Group Projects Build Your Interpersonal Skills

Let’s get back to the group member who does nothing. How would you react to this situation? Would you tattle on him, ignore him, try to engage him, or something else entirely? Your first reaction plays a significant role in how that person approaches the rest of the project. Now, don’t blame yourself if that person won’t budge no matter what, but here are some things to do to show your group project meddle and encourage everyone to do their part:

  • Ask everyone what part of the project matches their strengths or interests.
  • Ask for everyone’s input/advice on how the group should accomplish its goal(s).
  • Split into smaller groups. For example, if your group has four people, pair up to divide the project’s responsibilities. That way, no one can ‘fall through the cracks.’

If someone still won’t participate, don’t escalate the situation, but document what each group member contributed (or didn’t) to the final product.

If you’re not a leader, that fine. As long as you’re a team player, you’ve done your part. After all, you still have plenty of time to hone your leadership skills throughout the rest of high school and college.

Before wrapping up, let’s discuss one final piece of the group project puzzle that should help you long after high school graduation. 

Organization

Group projects require more advanced organizational skills than you might need if you tackled the same project on your own. Although you may consider yourself a master organizer, finding yourself having to track others’ progress and keep up with your own work can challenge even the best students.

There’s an easy way to solve this problem, something that works just as well in the classroom as it will in your future work environment. Imagine your group has a project and that you have three class periods to complete it. At the beginning of the project, have everyone set a goal. Someone in the group writes down each goal. At the end of the period, everyone reports back. Just like before, someone writes down every person’s progress. Some people might have worked ahead, others right on target, and others behind. As you repeat this process for days two and three, you can refer back to these notes to suggest quick and effective solutions:

  • Have someone who worked ahead assist someone who’s behind at the beginning of the next class.
  • Ask the people who are behind to finish up their daily goal as homework.

More importantly, by keeping track of everyone’s progress, it’s impossible to be blindsided by someone not pulling their weight.

Final Thoughts

Group projects aren’t perfect, but they teach you plenty of valuable life skills that can both raise your chances of college admission success and prepare you for just about any work environment.

Top 10 Colleges in the West Coast

By Emma Lorenzo

There are so many colleges available for students to choose from. It’s best for students to be aware of all their options for when applications come around.

For that reason, myKlovr has generated a list of the top ten colleges on the west coast.

 

1. Stanford University

Overview of Stanford University campus.

Location: Bay Area, CA

Total Enrollment: 16,914

Acceptance Rate: 5%

Fun Facts

Standford University was founded on November 11, 1885.

Stanford University has six schools, Business, Earth Energy and Environmental Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, and Medicine.

 

2. California Institute of Technology

Robert A. Millikan Memorial Library at Caltech.

Location: Pasadena, CA

Total Enrollment: 2,240

Acceptance Rate: 8%

Fun Facts

California Institute of Technology was founded in 1891.

The mascot of Caltech is a beaver, to honor natures engineers.

 

3. Pomona College

Mason Hall, an academic building at Pomona College.

Location: Claremont, CA

Total Enrollment: 1,703

Acceptance Rate: 10%

Fun Facts

Pomona College was founded in 1887.

An alumnus of Pomona college is Art Clokey, the creator of Gumby.

 

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Claremont McKenna CollegeLiberal Arts1,347Claremont, CA9%Suburban
5Harvey Mudd CollegeLiberal Arts829Claremont, CA13%Suburban
6University of California, BerkeleyUniversity40,174Berkeley, CA16%Urban
7University of California, Los AngelesUniversity44,497Los Angeles, CA18%Urban
8University of Southern CaliforniaUniversity43,871Los Angeles, CA17%Urban
9Scripps CollegeLiberal Arts1,057Claremont, CA30%Suburban
10Reed CollegeLiberal Arts1,396Portland, OR35%Suburban

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

How Does It Feel To Have a Half-Empty Nest?

By Kendell Shaffer

My oldest recently left for college and I am definitely feeling her absence. I first noticed as my son who is a high school  junior was getting ready for school. We both realized how easy the morning routine had become since he wasn’t fighting with his sister for the bathroom. And since he is sixteen, I am no longer driving carpool! Last year my mornings were very stressful getting them both out of the house and making the long drive to school with a car full of grumpy teenagers. So after eighteen years, I now have my mornings back.

My house is now cleaner. My daughter tended to spread out throughout the house with her things everywhere including in my room. She liked to make smoothies and weird concoctions in the blender and never really cleaned up properly. The dishes and laundry have sized down, as has the amount of homework help I am lending in the evenings.

I feel a shift in the house with her being gone but also an absence. It feels like something is wrong, kind of like there is a storm cloud blocking the sunshine.
But I do talk to her once a day and it’s lovely to hear her voice and to hear of her new adventures. She sends me photos of her new friends and tells me details about them. I feel really lucky that she wants to share this info with me. During her high school years, she kept a lot of her friends’ info to herself.

My husband remarked that dropping her off at college was like leaving her at Kindergarten. He wasn’t sure she was ready then and he doesn’t feel ready now. But we did leave her then and we left her last week. It’s the tough part of parenting, the knowing when to leave.

My daughter living away from home is an adjustment for all of us, but it’s not forever. It’s until Thanksgiving and maybe another trip home before then to see her brother in his school play. In the meantime, I am going to catch my breath. It’s been a fast and furious eighteen years. I remember after she was born thinking, okay now I can rest after that long pregnancy. And then the nurse handed her to me and I have not put her down since. Not until last week when I left her at college.

How to Pack For College

My daughter Sydney leaves for college in five days. Currently, her room is full of boxes and containers. She’ll be sharing a small dorm room with two other girls and has been advised not to take too much. So what exactly is essential?

“I didn’t take anything to college,” Sydney’s dad said last night. “I think I brought a toothbrush and a clock and that was it.” He is not a fan of the two-inch natural latex bed topper that we purchased. A mattress topper is on the college suggestion list of what to bring. Her dad remembered tripping over his GE electric clock that plugged into the wall. He kicked it repeatedly across the dorm room because he had no side table and his mattress was on the floor so the clock was also on the floor. He didn’t even have furniture in his dorm room. He told us this story as Sydney was packing her essential oils.

Sydney found her roommates online through a Facebook group established by the college. She was able to pre-screen and interview her potential roommates. Once they agreed to live together, they put their names on their dorm preference list and the college agreed. They’ve met each other once during the summer registration and have been in constant communication since. They determined who should be on the top bunk, who should have the bottom bunk and who gets the top bunk with no bed underneath based on a roll the dice app. They have also discussed room decor and texted each other pics from Bed Bath and Beyond getting approvals on purchases from each other.

Like Sydney’s dad, I had no mattress topper or pick of roommates or beds prior to my arrival at college. My roommates told me after I moved in, they snooped through my things and were confused when my record collection contained Broadway show tunes and Sex Pistols albums. Yes, I brought my stereo and record collection to college. We all did, so we had four stereos in our dorm room. I was relieved that my roommates didn’t have unicorns and rainbow posters on the walls, I didn’t really care what their music preferences were.

The important thing is that our children will sleep well. If the mattress topper and essential oils will help with that, then I am all for it. A touch of home doesn’t hurt, but starting fresh in a new place with new friends will be the true test of the freshman year. Fastweb has a pretty comprehensive list of what to bring to college, but be prepared, there is a lot more on it than a toothbrush and alarm clock!

Most Unusual Clubs in High School

By Emma Lorenzo

Colleges look at more than just grades and test scores. Getting involved in extracurriculars and clubs is a good way to boost a college resume.

Clubs and extracurriculars add depth to a college application and can showcase students’ individual interests and experiences. Colleges appreciate when students are passionate about something and take action to pursue their interests in a developmental and valuable way.

Sometimes, joining a club that is out of your comfort zone, might spark interests that you did not know you had.

MyKlovr asked users to fill out a one question survey about the most unusual clubs and extracurriculars at their high schools.

Below is a list (in no particular order) of the most unusual user submissions myKlovr received from high school students. Descriptions are provided for some.

Lettuce Eating Club

Once a year, club members race to see who can eat a head of lettuce the fastest. The winner becomes the new club president and plans the competition for the next year.

The Gentlemen’s Club

Young men in this club, dress up in suits and sip tea during club meetings.

Ghost Club

This club was formed because students believed that the school was haunted.  Haunted houses are organized every year for club members and the rest of the student body to attend.

Toast Club

Members of this club have a discussion while eating different types of toast.

Other Clubs Submitted

Waffle Eating Club
Buttons Club
Go Kart Club
Glassblowing Club
Chapstick of The Month Club
Rock, Paper, Scissors Club
Free Hugs Club
Cloud Watching Club
Ant Lovers United Club

Some additional unique club submissions myKlovr received were Lego Club, Biking Club, Culinary Club, and Line Dancing Club.

No matter the focus of the club, it is important to get involved in clubs or extracurriculars that you are interested in. It shows colleges that you have passions and you are willing to go out into the world and pursue what you love.

How Important Are Extracurricular Activities to College Admissions?

By Thomas Broderick

I’ve been around this great big world, and it seems that of all the cultures I’ve come across, the good ole’ U.S. of A. puts the most emphasis on high school students participating in extracurricular activities. Oh sure, high school students in other countries play sports and participate in clubs, but doing so doesn’t have much of an effect on college admissions.

For you see, in the rest of the world a high school student’s chances of getting into a good college rest entirely on grades and test scores, especially the latter. Seriously, being a high school student in some countries is just like that ham-fisted YouTube movie The Thinning, except without the threat of euthanasia because you scored lower than the mean.

So before we dive into the world of extracurricular activities, let us take a moment to appreciate the fact that your academic future isn’t 100% riding on standardized test scores.

*Moment of Appreciation*

That was nice. Now let’s talk extracurriculars, and how you can use any one of them to work for YOU during college admission season.

So which one should I do?

Simple Answer: Something that interests you.

Complex Answer: No matter which extracurricular or two that you pick, doing two things will help set you apart from the bulk of the competition. First, stick with an extracurricular for at least two years. Second, take on a leadership role where you get to show off your responsible/organized side. Consistency and leadership experience under your belt, you’re already a step ahead of the majority of college applicants.

Just the majority? How do I stand out from high achievers like me?

Simple Answer: Apply a personal touch, even if it means creating your own activity.

Complex Answer: If you’re aiming for a top tier school, you’re right to assume that most applicants will have both consistent track records with extracurriculars and hold leadership positions within them. Here’s how you can go a step above:

  • Create a new club, preferably one that does some good for the community. (College admission counselors love applicants who create volunteer organizations.)
  • Take a creative hobby to the next level.
    • Submit a short story for publication. (And get it published somewhere)
    • Submit your photography or artwork to contests.
    • Start your own company. (Think Shark Tank)
    • Take your band on tour over the summer. (But don’t skip school if you should become famous 😉 )

In other words, apply yourself to your passion, whatever it is. Even if you don’t succeed before college application time rolls around, your journey can make for an excellent personal essay.

Okay, my extracurriculars are great. What difference will they make?

Short Answer: They’re a tiebreaker.

Long Answer: Everyone loves a good story, and for college admissions counselors, an engaging story about an extracurricular activity can act as the tiebreaker between two highly qualified applicants. So, at the end of the day, you need extracurriculars just in case. Doesn’t matter if it’s the French club or your second studio album.

What you’re telling me is that extracurriculars are like an insurance policy?

Short Answer: Yep.

Long Answer: With college admissions getting more competitive seemingly by the minute, there’s a good chance that your extracurriculars will come in handy when the admissions counselor at Your Dream School reviews your application. You’ll never know if they were the deciding factor, but you wouldn’t want to be without them.

Final Thoughts

In summary, it matters less what extracurricular activity you choose than how you approach it. Like most things in life, the more you put into it, the more it’ll give back. You’ll make some friends, have fun, and hopefully do a little good in the process.

Let me leave you with some sage advice in the vein of homemaking guru Martha Stewart. “An extracurricular activity: it’s a good thing.”

 

 

Top 10 Colleges in The East Coast

By Emma Lorenzo

Choosing a college can be overwhelming for high school students when there seems to be a never-ending list of options.  Some schools are small, some are big, there are urban campuses, rural campuses, and some schools are private and some are state schools, the list goes on and on.

If you are unsure of where to even apply to, here is a list of the top ten schools on the east coast generated by myKlovr. It can be beneficial to apply to schools that will challenge you academically and personally.

1. Harvard University

Medical School at Harvard University.

Location: Cambridge, MA

Total Enrollment: 20,324

Acceptance Rate: 5%

Fun Facts

Harvard University was founded on September 8, 1636, and named after its first benefactor, John Harvard.

The first graduation ceremony for Harvard University was in 1642, honoring nine graduates.

2. Yale University

Law School at Yale University.

Location: New Haven, CT

Total Enrollment: 12,458

Acceptance Rate: 6%

Fun Facts

Yale University was founded in 1701 and named after Elihu Yale.

The most popular majors at Yale University are Cellular and Molecular Biology, History, Science and Government, and Psychology.

3. Princeton University

Nassau Hall; the oldest building at Princeton University.

Location: Princeton, NJ

Total Enrollment: 8,181

Acceptance Rate: 7%

Fun Facts

Princeton University was founded in 1746 and named after the town the college is located in, Princeton, New Jersey.

The school colors are black and orange and the school mascot is a Tiger.

 

The table below shows the other schools on the top ten list.

RankingSchoolType of SchoolTotal EnrollmentLocationAcceptance RateSetting
4Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyUniversity11,376Boston, MA8%Urban
5Columbia UniversityUniversity25,084New York, NY6%Urban
6Brown UniversityUniversity9,781Providence, RI9%Urban
7Duke UniversityUniversity15,928Durham, NC11%Suburban
8Dartmouth CollegeUniversity6,409Hanover, NH11%Rural
9Cornell UniversityUniversity22,319Ithaca, NY14%Rural
10Williams CollegeLiberal Arts2,134Williamstown, MA18%Rural

MyKlovr created this top ten list by taking the average of the rankings from The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, College Raptor, Education Corner, and Niche.

What High School Students Don’t See Coming

By Kyle Grappone

There are certain things about high school I remember vividly. Wasting time with my friends, talking to girls, and being the class clown that made everyone laugh. What I don’t remember is being serious, studying hard, or thinking about my life 5-10 years down the line. I didn’t do those things because I didn’t realize that I was supposed to. When you’re in high school, the last thing you think about is being an adult or getting a real job. This is one of the reasons why we have the problems we have today when it comes to thinking about our future.

After working for nearly ten years in the real world, I noticed two distributing trends. One, most of the people I knew and worked with disliked their jobs. Two would be the fact that hating your job was accepted as normal. How is it that so many people disliked not only their jobs but the type of person they had become? After extensive research, I realized that part of the reason this is happening is that this aspect of life is something high school and college students don’t see coming.

This is the motivation and inspiration for my new book To The Next Step. This book is designed to be an instruction manual for students like yourself to get the most out of your education and inspire you to think differently about your future. My goal is to help you avoid becoming one of those adults that have unfulfilled careers and unsatisfied lives.

One of the main messages of my book is that we should get rid of the age-old question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”. I want to eliminate this question because it is fundamentally flawed. How can students like yourself choose what you want to become when you probably don’t even understand the options and choices that are open to you? We need to change this question. You need to start asking yourself, “What type of person do I want to become?”. When you begin thinking about this question, the entire game changes. You will no longer be handcuffed to one occupation but instead opened to the idea of the kind of impact you want to make in the world. You have the power to choose if you’re going to be the type of person who heals, helps, protects, or educates. Now you can begin building this type of person in your mind and make sure that every decision you make enables you to become that person.

The first step you as a high school student can take in becoming the person you want to be is understanding what opportunities you need to take advantage of starting today. You think you want to be the type of person who entertains people, then you should begin networking with the head of the drama department or inquiring about participating in school plays and musical productions. If you find joy in helping people, you should volunteer your time at a nursing home, charity, or other local organizations that benefit the people in your community. This will give you a better understanding of what that type of work is like and will be much more rewarding than working at a local supermarket or a movie theatre.

Another essential step in this journey is to begin determining what you want to get out of your college education. This does not mean choosing a major, but rather making a list of possible majors and letting that narrow down your search. If you know you want to be someone who educates, you should research colleges known for their educational programs. It is also essential to understand the loans you will have to take out and how much you will have to pay back after college. Certain schools may be more expensive, but that does not mean they have better programs. Your goal should not be to go to a big name school, but instead, gain a valuable education at a price you can afford.

Topics such as navigating high school, applying to college, the college experience, life in the real world, and so much more will be addressed in my book. It is truly meant to be a guidebook to navigate students toward becoming the people they want to be and building a life that they love. Please check out the official campaign page and consider placing a pre-order today.

4 Tips to Help You Choose Your Major

By myKlovr

Choosing a major in college can be a daunting task that many think will determine the rest of their life and their future career path. Colleges often require students to state what their intended major is before even attending causing huge amounts of pressure on High School students to know what they want to major in before they even attend their first class is immense.

How can someone choose to major in something they’ve never experienced, never even taken as a class before? It’s not surprising that many of my college friends told me they realized the major they thought they wanted to pursue was something that they did not end up even majoring or minoring in!

I have been fortunate to be supported by a variety of people in choosing my major, and I have four tips on how to best take advantage of the resources around you to minimize stress and maximize satisfaction in making this decision. As a rising Sophomore in college, I am able to relate to the feeling of being overwhelmed by this daunting task, but through my tips I was able to feel more secure with my choice.

 

1. Take a variety of classes

In college, you have the opportunity to take a variety of courses, both in your interests and outside of them. This allows you to explore your current interests and discover new ones as well. My freshman year I took a psychology class and fell in love with the topics we covered. Now, I want to double major in psychology and anthropology a new interest and an existing one. Also, don’t wait until your senior year to try new courses. I have talked with seniors who regretted waiting until the last minute to step out of their comfort zones, because they found they were really good at and enjoyed the new subject.

 

2. Use your summer

For some, summer is a much needed break from the busy school year where one can relax. However, summer should also be seen time that can be taken advantage of. The few months are the perfect opportunity to find internships, take classes online, or even take classes at another college or university. Finding a job will grant you experience in the workplace and also add a boost to your resume, and you may realize working is actually a lot different than you imagined. It can help you begin forming an idea of what type of jobs suit you. Taking classes can grant you the opportunity to find new interests in different subject matter.

 

3. Take advantage of your friends and family

Because choosing a major can be so stressful, we often face this decision alone when we don’t have to. In fact, family and friends may be the key to making the right decision for you. You may realize that someone close to you struggled with the same decision, or majored in something you are considering. They may also have advice of their own which can help lead you in the right direction.

 

4. Use your College’s Career Office

Once you’re on campus, there are so many resources all around you that are there to help you! I know as a freshman I was intimidated by the career counseling office because I thought I was too young and inexperienced to use it. However, setting up a meeting with the faculty there, was one of the best decisions I had made. You should also look for support in your professors and advisors, as they are there to help you learn and develop your skills and interests.

 

In the end, as important as choosing a major can be, it is not going to trap you on a path to one particular career. I know lawyers who studied art history, and businessmen that studied linguistics. Though your major should be a decision you put thought into, your life will also not be determined by exactly what major or minor you choose. So have fun exploring your interests!

5 Must-Read Back to School Tips for Parents

By myKlovr

Though it may seem like the kids just got out of school, it is never too early to start prepping for the back to school season. With school starting next month for some, it is smart to get ahead of the game, but where do you start?

 

1. First things first, start with their basic backpack needs

The best place to start when it comes to back to school shopping is the traditional school supplies. Think about what your child is going to need in the classroom, or at school on a daily basis. Always stock up on extra paper, pencils, folders, binders, and notebooks. Even if they don’t end up using the supplies this time around, you will have them ready for next year.

One basic item that always comes up as a surprise expense is a graphing calculator. If your kid is in middle or high school, they will most likely need one of these for their math courses. It is important to invest in one that will last several years to prevent having to purchase a new one every year. You can’t go wrong with ordering one online to avoid scrambling once classes are back in session.

Outside of the backpack, a locker is a student’s safe space meant to store whatever they need with easy access. The best way to keep everything in the locker in order is purchasing some locker organization kits, with magnet organizers, shelves and supply drawers. These tools allow for optimized storage space and an eased state-of-mind.

With the unexpected accidents that we all periodically encounter, it can’t hurt to leave the locker stocked with some precautionary items such as a spare change of clothes, deodorant, mouthwash, extra pencils, and a few dollars in the event they forgot to pack a lunch.

 

2. When it comes to lunches and snacks, don’t make things too difficult for yourself

It’s always been best to eat natural and stay healthy, but nowadays, it’s also trendy. From Kombucha Drinks to acai bowls, kids these days love posting pictures on Instagram of their healthy, colorful foods. Keep it simple and always have fruit and vegetables ready to serve. Hummus and peanut butter go well with different crackers or some vegetables. For example, you can always pack the traditional “ants on a log” (celery and peanut butter with raisins). Don’t go crazy trying to prepare anything too fancy or exotic, unless you have the time, in which case, go for it.

As far as packing these healthy lunches goes, consider investing in an insulated lunch box to ensure a fresh meal. Some schools don’t serve lunch until four or five hours after the students arrive, so you want to make sure their food isn’t too warm, soggy, or stale.

 

3. A good sense of style goes a long way

Your student’s daily cuisine isn’t the only thing you’ll want to keep fresh this back to school season. A good sense of style goes a long way in school. The first week of school is crucial when it comes to showcasing your fashion sense and making excellent first impressions, but you may not know what’s in and trending. It never hurts to take a look at Teen Vogue every once in a while.

If you haven’t noticed, comfortable and athletic wear is what’s trending, which is perfect for long school days. You can’t go wrong with buying a comfortable pair of shoes and some track pants for the school day.

While athletic wear is currently in style, it is important to note that dressing for success does, in fact, help increase productivity. According to Brain Fodder, when a person wears a suit or formal wear, there is a psychological response that makes them feel more powerful than usual. Perhaps once a week, your child can have a day where they dress nicer to boost their self-esteem and improve the quality of their work.

Shopping for clothes can also be very expensive, which is why shopping smart and being aware of the deals around you is key to a successful back to school season. During the summer and early fall, winter clothes are marked down and on sale. They are the same quality as what’s sold in the fall and winter, but with the demand on them being lower, retailers are forced to lower the sale price. For parents shopping, it would be beneficial to take advantage of these deals and shop in advance for the coming winter months.

 

4. Start planning for your child’s post-secondary future

Planning for the future, whether it is shopping for clothes or setting up a savings account, is the best way to build security for yourself and your family. That is why this back to school season you should consider planning for your child’s post-secondary future. While most public schools have an on-site counselor, on average there are 482 students per college counselor, which results in a lack of guidance for the majority of students. Not everyone has the means or resources to hire a private college counselor, which can end up costing parents thousands of dollars.

This is why myKlovr, the world’s first digital college counselor, is an investment you should be willing to make. The platform is powered by artificial intelligence and has several features that will prove to be useful in helping you achieve their academic goals including an extremely customizable college finder, a GPA calculator for every grading scale, a personalized student dashboard and a linked parent account to help hold the child accountable and provide mentorship.

Outside of myKlovr, there are several other tech products in the realm of back to school shopping that any student must have. While laptops and tablets are often not required in school, they do help students to stay organized and keep track of their assignments with ease. If you do end up buying one of these, they can be pretty expensive and you want to make sure they last.

Getting a protective case for your phone and laptop is a wise choice and will provide some insurance of your electronic devices’ safety. With these new devices, you can’t go wrong with purchasing a good pair of headphones. Listening to music is very popular amongst youth and is also important when it comes to helping to relieve stress with the day-to-day challenges kids face in school.

 

5. Invest in products and services that help alleviate their stress

Let’s face it, school isn’t as easy as it once was. With the technology emerging at a rapid pace, excessive news coverage of political topics and national tragedies, the ongoing pressure of maintaining a social presence on the internet, constant contact with their social network, and many other factors, being an adolescent has never entailed so much baggage.

That’s why investing in products and services that help alleviate stress is vital for this back to school season. Listening to music is one way to eliminate some stress, but there are other items you can buy to help reduce the amount of stress your child endures. Organizational tools like a planner or purposed storage always help to declutter. Lotions, candles and bath products with scents like lavender and vanilla are also found to be beneficial in relaxing many people. Don’t hesitate to provide your kid with tools allowing them to relax because it can prove to make them more productive in the rest of their lives.

Encourage your child to exercise more often by buying a gym membership or a pair of running shoes. We all know that exercising is good for your physical health, but according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), it also can help to greatly reduce stress levels. Acknowledging your child’s stress and anxiety and taking preventative action is important for the well-being of your child.

The most important part of the back to school process is to allow yourself time to make your list and get all of the shopping done. It is never a good idea to leave it all for the last minute. So start talking with your child now and get a head start on your back to school shopping.

SPOTLIGHT: What It’s Like To Be a Division I Athlete From A Parent’s POV

By Kendell Shaffer

Craig’s daughter Morgan played D1 lacrosse in college. After graduation in 2014, Morgan went on to get her masters degree and is now a Doctor of Physical Therapy.

Hi Craig, thanks for sharing your story about Morgan. At what age did Morgan begin playing lacrosse and when did your family think she might play lacrosse in college?

Morgan began playing lacrosse around six years old and I think we all thought she’d play in college back when she was in middle school.

Was Morgan recruited? If so, what was the process like to be recruited as a D1 athlete?

She was pretty seriously recruited by about twelve to fifteen schools. Most coaches who were interested had seen her play in summer and fall “Showcase Tournaments.” She had invited the coaches prior to the events to watch her play. Luckily, she played for a Club Team that had a pretty good reputation, so a lot of coaches came to watch her team play.

Once a coach had contacted her, we made sure she emailed the coach back thanking them for their interest and then she’d stay in touch. Eventually, the list of schools got paired down due to a variety of reasons, some on Morgan’s account, others on the school’s account.

The recruiting game often comes down to numbers – the number of recruits the school desires and to a lesser degree, the amount of money they have to spend on scholarships. One school that was VERY interested in Morgan dropped off the face of the earth once they got the number of commitments they were looking for. Morgan had told them that although they were her first choice, she wanted to see some of the other schools who had expressed interest. I guess that once other players had verbally committed, there wasn’t any more room for Morgan.

Did you visit or tour multiple colleges?

For Morgan, it was very important to see as many schools as she could, not only to see what she liked, but equally as important, what she DIDN’T like. There were a lot of college visits, a ton of emails and some frustrations as well as smiles!! It was all worth it when Morgan received “the call” from a coach asking her to join thier team.  This call came when we were on vacation around July 4th (following her junior year of high school) and from that point on, as long as Morgan kept her grades up, her senior year would be smooth sailing.

Was she offered athletic scholarships?

She was offered a small scholarship ( most of the other money had been allocated to others) but that was quite a day!!

How much of her time at college was devoted to playing lacrosse?

Playing a sport at a Division 1 school is a full time job!! While lacrosse is a spring sport, there were practices in the fall as well as the spring and “self workouts” during the summer. An athlete MUST love the sport and be totally dedicated to play a D1 sport in college. 

Do you think lacrosse had ever taken away from Morgan’s academics?

Since there is so much time involved with practice, workouts and travel, time management becomes of utmost importance to balance academics and athletics. Luckily, Morgan learned this in high school and was very organized when it came to her studies.

Do you feel the balance of being an athlete was beneficial to her academic success?

There is no doubt in my mind that striking this balance helped her academically and why she did so well in both college and grad school.

Did being on a sports team in college help to give her an identity, or a group of friends to be with?

Being on a team in college becomes one’s family/sorority and those friendships often become lifelong. It certainly made the transition to college life easier having a built in support network.

What might you do differently if you had to do it all over?

I don’t think we’d do anything differently.

Any parting words for other parents just beginning their search with a D1 athlete?

For any parents entering in this “game” first and foremost, enjoy the ride!! There will be many ups and downs, but it WILL all work out for the best. Please be realistic about your child’s talent level and know how good  he or she is. 

Pick schools that if your child never steps on the field again, they will be happy attending. Remember, very few if any college athlete gets a job playing their sport so go to a school that has a major your child is interested in. Ultimately, your child will know which school is right for them, so let them make the decision without a lot of pressure from you.

The NCAA has some pretty stringent rules about how and when to contact coaches so make sure to be aware of those rules. Also, don’t be afraid to ask the coach where your child stands as far as the whole recruitment thing goes. The coaches should be honest with you and it is imperative that you are honest with them.

Thank you so much, Craig. And best of luck to Dr. Morgan!

Summer SAT/ACT Test Prep Progress

By Kendell Shaffer

Two months ago my son agreed to do SAT test prep for twenty minutes a day. That plan went pretty well the first week, but we found that on weekends, his days were so packed he could barely find a minute to study. He’d been using an SAT test prep book at home and we were just about to go on a long road trip. I was worried his twenty-minutes-a-day plan would disappear. Then I discovered SAT and ACT practice apps I could download for free. I was elated. He was a bit bummed that he now had no excuse not to study on the road, but I convinced him the apps are game-like and might relieve some boredom on the long car ride.

These are a few that he has tried:

Math Brain Booster Games is a free download in the Apple Store. This game helps to build speed and mental math skills. It’s fun to pick up and “play” and has a timed element which gives it a competitive edge. Their description notes, “it will improve ATTENTION, REACTION and VELOCITY.”

The Daily Practice for the SAT®, free app from The College Board, has several parts. One that my son found helpful was the Scan and Score feature which allows you to take a photo of your SAT practice worksheet and obtain instant test scores. They offer an SAT Question of the Day, or the chance to binge on specific SAT practice questions. Not the funnest interface, but definitely closet to the real thing given that it was created by The College Board.

Magoosh offers the free ACT Practice Flashcards app. This harmless interface allows the student to move through a series of flashcards and set their own practice pace. By logging in, your child can keep track of their progress and easily pick up where they left off. Practice sessions for English include: Punctuation and Grammar, and Structure and Style. For Math: Integer Properties, Fractions and Ratios, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry and Advanced Topics. For Science: Earth Science, Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

So no need to let the family summer road trip be an excuse for your child to stop SAT or ACT prep. And parents, you might want to try the app once in awhile. There’s nothing wrong with a little mental math practice in your adult years. And besides, children learn from example, right?

College Fun Facts

By Thomas Broderick

Good day, loyal myKlovr readers. As we’re in the dog days of summer, the standard advice column doesn’t seem right. Instead, let’s beat the heat with some college fun facts!

Don’t Waste Your Plague Break

When you think of unexpected breaks from school, images of snow, flooding, or other inclement weather might come to mind. However, disease can have the same effect. Every year, flu season shuts down school districts across the nation.

But did you know that back in the day, college students got out of school for bubonic plague? It’s true, and the story of what one student did with his plague break changed the world forever.

The year was 1665, and Jolly Olde England was suffering from the plague. Cambridge University had to shut its doors for a year. At the time, Isaac Newton had just started his graduate education. Like the other students, Isaac was forced to return to his family home. But did he spend the next year just sitting around playing Fortnite? Well…of course not. Fortnite didn’t exist back then. Electricity didn’t exist back then. Duh.

So what did Isaac Newton do with his time? Oh, not much. He just invented a little thing called Calculus and worked on his theory of gravity. So the next time you want to thank a falling apple for Newton’s grand revelation, thank the plague instead. And whenever you get another unexpected day off from school, make Isaac proud by getting out there and curing cancer. 😉

The Ivy League Exists Because of Football

If you attend an Ivy League school, there’s a good chance that you’ll see some actual ivy. However, the Ivy League did not get its name due to the reputation of its schools or the large amount of ivy that grows on the members’ campuses.

It was all about football.

You see, a long, long time ago (the 1930s), the eight schools that make up the Ivy League got together to form an athletic league. Even back then, each Ivy League school was already well known for its academics. So thank football, and not the mystical powers of ivy to imbue students with knowledge, for the Ivy League.

You Thought American Colleges Were Big

America sure has some big colleges. The University of Central Florida comes out at just over 55,000 undergraduates. Phew. That’s more people than the town where I grew up! But UCF doesn’t hold a candle to the biggest university in the world: Indira Gandhi National Open University. How much bigger than UCF are we talking about? Twice as big? Ten times as big? Twenty times as big?

Try 72 times as big. That’s over 4,000,000 students. Thankfully, students take courses online or through the mail. Can you imagine the commute to that campus?

Movies About College Are Sweet, Sweet Lies

When I was a kid, I watched a bunch of Saved by the Bell. Even then, I wondered how the characters could spend so much time talking in the halls. Didn’t they have classes to go to? When I got to high school, I found out that Saved by the Bell and other TV shows about high school were lies. I only had minutes to run between classes among hundreds of other loud, pushy teenagers.

Unfortunately, college movies are just the same: sweet, sweet lies. Sorry, readers, but in real life, the same fate would befall Van Wilder, Frank the Tank, and every member of Delta House:

They would all be rotting in a federal penitentiary.  🙁

The Birth of the Hot Pocket – Sort Of

When you earn your bachelor’s degree, the graduation garb is fairly straightforward: jet black muumuu and a cardboard hat. On the other end of the spectrum, graduates earning their doctorates wear fancy robes with stripes and all sorts of colors that scream ‘Look at me! I spent so much money on this degree!’

The outfit for graduates earning their master’s degrees is somewhere in between. However, the sleeves contain small pockets that extend past the cuffs. Why are they there?

Potato storage.

The story goes that back in the day master’s graduates were so poor that they had no other way to transport food but in their clothes. Thus potato pockets were born. So when you get your master’s degree, don’t feel bad if you get weird looks when you whip out a loaded baked potato during the graduation ceremony.

Hey, it’s a long ceremony. Why should you go hungry?

Final Thoughts

Well, myKlovr readers, I hope this article has enlightened you a bit about the stranger side of the college experience. That being said, get some rest during these final days of summer. If your high school schedule for the coming year includes a lot of honors, AP, or IB courses, you’ll need your rest.

Do Scholarship Programs Like FastWeb Really Pay Off?

By Kendell Shaffer

With college prices soaring into the $70K range any bit of scholarship money can help. I’ve been exploring several online scholarship programs and wondering if they work. About a year ago I signed up for FastWeb.com. By plugging in a series of details about my daughter’s interest and talents, an algorithm generated a list of matches for independent scholarships. Many were state or city related and they ranged between $250- $10,000. Every day for a year I have received an email from Fastweb informing me about the many scholarship programs my daughter may qualify for.

In most cases, the scholarships required some work from my daughter in terms of an essay or short paragraph. For example, there is a National Rice Scholarship contest that is given to a student who resides in a state where rice is produced, California being one of them so my daughter qualified. In order for her to win, she’d have to write an essay about how rice was important to her life. She laughed at me when I suggested she write about her Japanese class in middle school making omusubi weekly for school lunches. She had no desire to write that essay, but more to the point, she really didn’t have time. She’d spent the year writing essays and supplemental essays for college applications plus all the essays for school. The last thing she felt she could do, was write about rice.

I was overwhelmed as well with the college application process and found myself ignoring these emails. I learned that thousands of kids would be applying for each scholarship so her chances were slim. Many of the scholarships were from corporations like Coca-Cola. Local Rotary clubs offered sponsorships too, but she had no direct connection to them. I did get my daughter to apply to one scholarship from a car company that offered $1000 for a photo with a car and a story. Since my daughter’s middle name is Lark, after the Lark Studebaker, we took a shot at that and sent in a photo and story. We never heard back, not even a generic reply.

Now that it’s summer and exams and essays are over, I am starting to open those emails from FastWeb and encourage her to apply for some small scholarships. Any bit will help to buy books or towards trips home. I’ve also learned about myscholly.com, another scholarship search tool.

It all comes down to time and money. The more time we put into seeking out scholarships, the more they might pay out. For parents with younger students, I’d suggest familiarizing yourself with scholarship searches and maybe prep your child for a couple. Have them start thinking now about how rice is important in their life.

Round Two: Planning Ahead for College Tours With Your Second Child

By Kendell Shaffer

I found myself in NYC this past week with my family and as I walked by New York University it dawned on me that it was time to take my sixteen-year-old on college tours. He attended all the tours with his sister two years ago, but since his interests are different from hers, he wants his own college experience.

So I quickly got online and booked a couple of college tours in the city. His sister was a good sport and attended the tours with us. She explained to him that he needed to check in with the tour director, showing demonstrated interest was important and the college starts a file for you the minute you register for the tour. I noticed her nudging him to ask questions or to pay attention when he was drifting off.

Dinner conversation that night shifted from my daughter’s college talk to his. It was kind of surreal for all of us since we had just spent the last two years talking about my daughter’s college journey. It was fun to watch him think about his future and he had some serious ideas of where he wants to attend after touring all the schools with his sister.

So even if he toured with his sister, does he need to tour the same schools again for himself? I think so since the colleges do want to see demonstrated interest. And in the case of some schools, his sister toured a different department then he would be majoring in. Does this mean we need to repeat the same college tour vacation we had two springs ago? Do we take his sister with us who will then be deep into college herself by then? All these decisions are creeping up quickly. My short answer is to take him on a tour next Spring to a city that has a bunch of schools he wanted to see that his sister didn’t. And next summer we can regroup and narrow down his choices. He needs to figure out if he wants to go to art school, theater school or a liberal arts college where he can do both art and theatre. I am hoping he won’t need to do all the auditions our friend Anne did. But thrilled we have some good art school portfolio prep from our friend Edie.

We are back home now and the first thing Jasper did was come into my room this morning and ask if he could use my computer to look up some colleges he’d been thinking about. When I picked up the computer later in the day, I noticed all the schools he had looked at were in England. Looks like we will be heading across the pond for next summer’s college tour vacation.

4 Mistakes to Avoid During the College Selection Process

By Matt Wujciak

You’re a Die-hard Fan

Everyone has their favorite college football or basketball program. But picking a school because you like their sports teams or because your parents went there isn’t always in your best long term interest.

After all, your college experience is about you, more specifically about what you learn that will make you a better, smarter, and happier person. Although school comradery is important, you’re not there to spend your college career in the cheering section.

 

They Specialize in your Favorite Subject:

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, about 80 percent of students in the United States end up changing their major at least once. On average, college students change their major at least three times over the course of their college career. No one is telling you not to follow your passion or desired career path.

However, it is important to note that you will most likely be changing your major throughout your college career. That’s why most schools give you at least a year or two before choosing a major is required.

To put things into perspective for you, I once knew a kid who chose his school based on what he thought he wanted to major in. He loved Economics in high school and wanted to attend a college that had the best Econ program that he could get into.

Two years in and he realized that this was nothing like the experience he was anticipating. He decided to change his major from Econ to a less strenuous business concentration such as Marketing or Entrepreneurship.

At that point, he began wishing he hadn’t chosen the best Economics school that he could find, but perhaps the best general business school… a school with a wider variety of strengths that he could have explored before picking his concentration.

 

Being a Follower

Whatever you do, do not follow a friend or significant other to the college of their choice. This piece of advice is very simply, yet extremely important. Remember that college is one of the most critical and momentous times of your life. Try to make the decision that is best for you and your future, not your temporary demands or desires.

Although following a friend might seem like a good idea at the time, there will come a point in your relationship where you are presented with a crossroad. Either that relationship will end which means maybe this decision was in everyone’s best interest, or become stronger, overcoming distance, as well as time.

 

Temptation of Partying

Now this potential mistake might seem obvious to avoid, but it can be a tough subconscious concept for many eager students to grasp, especially when you are looking forward to moving away from Mom and Dad and into the college environment for the first time. Actively remind yourself what your end goal is.

As you begin to make your final decision on selecting your college, remember the increase in responsibilities and decisions that you will face. Don’t compensate your future for the short term happiness that a big warm party school might provide, especially in one of the most pivotal points of your life. Because at the end of the day, these are only four years, but they’ll have an impact on each one to come. How are you going to use them?

A Tour of Freshman Summer Reading from Various Colleges and Universities

By Kendell Shaffer

Since my kids were in middle school, I made a point to read each book that their teachers assigned. I liked to discuss the books at dinner and I was always curious about a book I hadn’t read. Julie of the Wolves byJean Craighead George was a surprise to me and sticks with me to this day. Learning about wolf packs from the POV of the wolf was something I could only get from this middle grade reader. Once in a while I’d read a book that seemed inappropriate like when Sold by Patricia McCormick was assigned to my sixth grader. Luckily, some of the other parents in the class felt the same way and we were able to discuss our concerns with the teacher before the students took it on themselves.

Summer reading in high school introduced me to some great reads like the tenth grade assignment of Americana by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, which my son is reading now. And everyone should have the pleasure of reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon  that was assigned to both my kids the summer before ninth grade.

A year ago I read a NYT article about summer reading for college freshman around the country. I was excited to see that summer reading would not go away once college began. I don’t remember being assigned books in summer. Keeping up with the books on this NYT article was a way for me to find books of interest that were contemporary and I was excited to find my daughter assigned two books this summer by her college: Island of a Thousand Mirrors by Nayomi Munaweera and Unflattening by Nick Sousanis. Sydney is loving Island of a Thousand Mirrors and I recently learned that Nayomi Munaweera tours hundred of colleges and will do a reading at my daughter’s school in the fall.

Among the schools asking students to read specific books this summer, I’ve found the following:  UC Berkeley – Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (because she will be there in person at her keynote event on August 23); Bard College – Bacchae by Euripides; Wesleyan University – A Body, Undone: Living on After Great Pain by Christina Crosby; Lafayette College – Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly.

I’m hoping my daughter will continue to share her reading list with me once she goes to college. It will give me some great reads as well as allowing me to have fun and intellectual discussions with her when she returns home. A shared interest in books can help keep us connected in a familiar way while she’s tucked away at in her new school and I am getting used to my empty nest.

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