growth

5 Ways To Make This School Year The Best One Yet

By Kyle Grappone

Like it or not, the new school year is almost upon us and in some parts of the country, it is already here. As a student, I remember having a hard time being excited for the new school year because it meant the end of summer vacation. I had developed a mindset that each school year was the same. I treated it as a nuisance that I had to trudge through.

What myself, and many of my fellow graduates who I have spoken to over the years, failed to realize was that each school year was a unique opportunity to build towards our future. The beginning of each year was a chance to start fresh, set goals, and build towards the type of person we want to become and the life we want to live. If you are thinking that this upcoming year will be just like last year, here are the 5 ways to make it not only better but your best one yet.

#1 – Determine What You Are Working Towards

What is the one thing you want or need to accomplish this school year? Is it developing better study habits? Narrowing down your college list by visiting campuses? Has your GPA suffered due to lack of motivation or concentration? Figure out what you need to accomplish this school year. This will give you the motivation to pay attention in class, try harder on your tests, and give you a reason to start each school day with excitement instead of dread.

Let’s put it another way. What is one thing you want to be able to say about yourself in June? Is it that you know where you want to go to college? Perhaps, there is a class that you have always struggled in and it is hurting your GPA. If you have an interest in a specific career, take this time to research it and figure out what you can do this year to move towards that career. Pick something you want to accomplish and use that as your driving force when school feels boring, routine, or overwhelming.

#2 – Learn a brand new skill

The more skills you have when you enter the real world, the better off you will be. Do not just spend your free time watching TV and playing video games. Pick something you have always wanted to learn and carve out time each week to learn it. Ask your family members what was one skill they wish they knew before going off to college or entering the workforce.

First, this will give you a leg up on your fellow students when they are applying to college. You will have something unique to talk about during your college essay or interview. Second, it keeps your creative juices flowing. When it is time to take a break from school work you can turn to something that will be fun yet challenging. Lastly, on those days where school feels like a drag, you can power through knowing you will be doing something fun later on that day.

#3 – Identify and Break One Bad Habit

We all have bad habits. However, there is a difference between the annoying small ones and the life-altering big ones that prevent us from reaching our full potential. For me, it was not staying organized with my class notes. I was constantly shoving my worksheets and other important pieces of paper into my backpack and often losing them completely. I thought they were worthless once class was over. However, my lack of organization came back to haunt me when it came time to study for tests. My grades suffered significantly as a result.

Think about last school year and about any habits that prevented you from doing your best, growing as a person, or reaching your goals. Then, write down when this habit pops up the most and how it hurts you the most. Once you understand where this habit is doing the most damage, write out your step by step plan to fix it. For example, if you always wait until the last minute to finish a project, create a process for yourself. Start by listing out the different things you need to do for that project. Then assign a daily or weekly due date to each part. Take a minute to register how good it feels when you complete each part, knowing that you will have less work to do moving forward.

#4 – Begin Building Your Network

The idea of a network might be a bit foreign to you. In simple terms, a network is a group of working professionals that you have developed a relationship with. You can call on people in this network for advice when it comes to applying to college, internships, and your first job. Your network is also invaluable when you are researching possible careers and majors. These are the people who have come before you and have the advice you need to make the right choices.

To ensure you are building the right network, you first have to start thinking about what types of jobs and careers you are interested in. This list may change, but to start, think about what you are passionate about and what interests you. Then, make a list of jobs that align with those interests. When you are ready, seek out working professionals who are currently working those jobs. You will be amazed and what you will learn about their jobs, what they went to school for, and what your life might be like if you pursue that career.

#5 – Develop A Growth Mindset

All of the ways I just mentioned play into the idea of developing a growth mindset. That term can mean many things. For you, as a high school student, it means keeping your mind open to new ways of becoming a better and smarter person. Actively seek out opportunities where you can develop a new skill, meet new people, and learn about your future opportunities.

Every morning when you wake up for school, make the decision that you are going to take a positive approach to the day. Get yourself excited about your classes by remembering what you are working towards. Approach the upcoming day knowing that you will learn new skills, lookout for opportunities to grow, and be working towards building the future you want for yourself.

Conclusion

Too many graduates, myself included, floated their way through high school. Each day, month and year were treated the same because they never took the time to think about what was coming next. I challenge you to challenge yourself this upcoming school year. Decide that this is the year you make significant changes in your lifestyle and attitude. Ten years from now, when you are living a life of purpose and satisfaction, you can look back on this year knowing it was the year that started it all.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is the founder of To The Next Step, an educational coaching and services company designed to prepare students for the next steps in life including college, entering the workforce and the real world. He offers several student focused services including one on one coaching and on-demand courses. You can learn all about it at www.ToTheNextStep.org or by emailing him directly at Kyle@ToTheNextStep.org.

3 Things To Do Before Starting Any School Year

By Kyle Grappone

Summer vacation is a time for relaxation. It is time to take a mental break from the previous school year and allow yourself to enjoy the company of family and friends. However, like it or not, the next school year is right around the corner. I am not trying to be a bummer. I am trying to help you avoid the mistakes that past students have made.

Many of my college-age coaching clients often speak about how they wasted their time in high school and never thought about preparing for college or the real world. A lot of my friends and co-workers say the same thing. It is very easy to float through school and do just enough to get by. The key is to plan and ensure that each year has a purpose and is helping you build towards the future you want.

Today, we are going to talk about three things to do before starting any school year. The great thing about this list is that it can be used over and over again. Regardless of where you are in your educational journey, these three tasks can be completed each year to ensure you remain on track and prepared for the next steps in life. These are valuable habits that you can start now and will reap long term benefits for years to come.

Determine What You Are Working Towards

When I was in high school, I had one goal. Survive. Looking back, this was a pretty stupid mindset to have because it did not motivate me to do anything. All I tried to do each day was pass my classes with the least amount of effort possible. I treated each school year like they were identical, and like a chore, I had to complete. My result was a rude wake-up call in college when I lacked the studying habits and discipline to succeed in my classes.

Take a look at the upcoming year and discover it’s purpose. If you are a high school freshman, this year is dedicated to building a strong GPA, solid study habits, and exploring new friendships and opportunities. If you are a sophomore or junior, you are working through the college application and selection process. If you are a senior, you are choosing a college and preparing for what’s to come once you get there.

What are you working towards this year? What is the purpose of you being in class? What skills do you need to develop to reach your goals? Take the time to understand what specific goals you are working towards. This allows you to put together a clear path to success and supplies you with motivation throughout the year. This purpose and motivation are critical when you are sitting in a class you do not like or feel like slacking off halfway through the year.

Perform An Educational Audit

Before you enter the new year, there is always something of value to learn from the one that just passed. In my book, To The Next Step, I require the reader to perform this type of audit before the beginning of each new year. The purpose is to look back on your classes, grades, and habits to see what worked and what needs work.

The most important aspect of this audit is to understand what classes you did well in. This will help clarify what you are interested in and what you enjoy learning about. These findings can prove useful when you are starting to research possible majors and colleges. You also need to understand what classes you did not do well in. The reason for this is twofold. One, it allows you to pinpoint where the biggest threat to your GPA is going to be and how to plan to fix it. Two, it gives you insight about what you do not enjoy in school and what you will most likely not enjoy studying in college or working out in the real world.

Calculate your yearly and overall GPA. Understand exactly where you are, and set a goal for where you want to be next year. Again, this will motivate you to push past the temptation of being lazy and develop a mindset that allows you to reach these goals. Also, as you research colleges, you will begin to see what type of GPA they are requiring. You are much less likely to get caught off guard if you have been monitoring your grades and working towards improving them each year.

Take Over Two Tasks Your Parents Currently Do For You

This last one has nothing to do with academics and everything to do with preparing for the real world. A major downfall of college students who go away to school is their inability to perform basic life tasks once they are on their own. Even college graduates who move out are often overwhelmed with stress regarding making doctors appointments, going grocery shopping, budgeting their money, and other adult tasks that come with growing up.

If you are a current student, as soon as you are done with this blog post, I would like you to make a list of every single task your parents currently do for you. Then, at the start of each school year, take two responsibilities from that list and commit to owning them. For example, when the new year starts, commit to making your own lunch and scheduling your own doctor’s appointments. These are two simple skills that if learned now, will make life a lot easier for you down the road.

The tasks you choose are entirely up to you. My advice would be as a high school student choose tasks that you know you will have to do in college. As a college student, select tasks that are waiting for you in the real world. It is much easier to transition into becoming a responsible adult over several years then to attempt to do it all at once.

Conclusion

It is never too early to plan for the future. The easiest thing in life to do is not to care or care just enough to get by. That might work now but trust me you will come to regret it later. My advice, based on the regrets and missteps of past graduates, would be to attend school with purpose and passion. Outline your goals before each school year and develop the mindset and work ethic you need to achieve them.

About Kyle

Kyle Grappone is the founder of To The Next Step, an educational coaching and services company designed to prepare students for the next steps in life including college, entering the workforce and the real world. He offers several student-focused services including one-on-one coaching and on-demand courses. You can learn all about it by emailing him directly at Kyle@ToTheNextStep.org. 

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