senioryear

How to Support Your Child with Senioritis

In the dictionary, Senioritis is described as, “a supposed affliction of students in their final year of high school or college, characterized by a decline in motivation or performance.” It’s the word “supposed” that makes me laugh. Because when I asked my senior daughter to describe Senioritis, she said, “Teachers should acknowledge that second semester of senior year is exhausting and they should give us a break. Teachers think Senioritis is a joke and they get angry at it.”

After doing four performances of her high school musical this weekend, two months of after school and Saturday rehearsals, debates on alternative weekends, college applications, SAT’s, college essays, and keeping up a full load of honors classes there is not much left of her. And the thought of not knowing where she will be attending school next year, where she will be living, knowing she will be away from family and friends is only adding to the stress.

These seniors are mentally and physically exhausted. As juniors they were told by college counselors to keep up the rigor in senior year. That colleges don’t want to see you taking easy classes. So in my daughter’s case, this year has been one of her toughest academically. “I thought senior year was supposed to be fun,” she often says. From my point of view, this year as been anything but. There are fun things ahead; a senior class trip, Prom, yearbook day, graduation, but even those events have deadlines and inherent pressures.

And what about the parents? Aren’t we entitled to a bit of Senioritis too, or how about Parentitis? I don’t know about other parents with seniors, but I am exhausted. The journey to college has been constant, stressful, emotional and unnerving at times. I cannot wait to have this all behind us and hope my daughter winds up in the perfect college for her in the perfect dorm with the perfect roommate. But I know perfection is not possible and only imagine there will be lots of hands on counseling from afar next year.

So maybe Senioritis is a “supposed affliction” and not acknowledged by teachers. But it’s real in my house. And how best to support my daughter when I don’t have many reserves left? As my fiend, Gwen said in last week’s blog, “I tried to keep things calm and light and make sure she was never late, had everything she needed and was fed and watered.” Thanks, Gwen, I will be applying those ideas to help get us through the rest of this year. At least fed and watered I can handle.

Do Grades in Senior Year Matter?

Eight hours on New Year’s Eve. That’s how much time was spend in our house finishing up college applications. Proofreading final supplements, finalizing payments, sending in SAT’s and art portfolios, asking last minute questions to the very patient and available high school college counselor. But the most time was spent deliberating over the final college list. Going back and forth about whether or not to apply to Early Decision 2. We decided not to.

Exhausted by four o’clock in the afternoon, the applications were all in. I was ready to sleep, my daughter was ready to celebrate. As the fireworks went off above our house at midnight, I realized what a hurdle we’d been through getting this far. It was a time to pause. The next chapter was just about to begin. Decisions will be made. And this time next year, she would have completed her first year of college. And right now, we have no idea where that will be.

I like that the application process coincided with New Year’s Eve. I’m ready to put the hard work behind and start fresh. For my daughter, she’ll move through the rest of the year with the school musical, swim team, and her final semester of high school.

But since all the applications are in and transcripts to colleges sent, do these final grades matter? Yes, they do. The colleges will only accept students who maintain their grades in the spring semester of senior year. I have heard stories from parents whose child let their grades slide and their offer to the college of choice was withdrawn.

UC Irvine rescinded 500 acceptances last year two months before Fall term stating in some cases the reason being fallen grades in senior year.  Although seniors should be allowed to take a breath after all this hard work, they need to be careful and treat the rest of the year as carefully as they have the previous years.

I want my daughter to have a fun summer. A summer job and trips to the beach is what I hope for her. No academic classes. Although we have just learned that if accepted to any of the UC schools, the freshmen are encouraged to start in the summer semester, eight weeks earlier than the fall semester begins. That would mean one month of summer, then moving into the dorms in July. So much to think about and to plan for, if only we could plan. Instead we wait a couple of months until the decisions roll in.

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